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Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history

Yu, He; Jamieson, Alexandra; Hulme-Beaman, Ardern; Conroy, Chris J.; Knight, Becky; Speller, Camilla; Al-Jarah, Hiba; Eager, Heidi; Trinks, Alexandra; Adikari, Gamini; Baron, Henriette; Böhlendorf-Arslan, Beate; Bohingamuwa, Wijerathne; Crowther, Alison; Cucchi, Thomas; Esser, Kinie; Fleisher, Jeffrey; Gidney, Louisa; Gladilina, Elena; Gol’din, Pavel; Goodman, Steven M.; Hamilton-Dyer, Sheila; Helm, Richard; Hillman, Jesse C.; Kallala, Nabil; Kivikero, Hanna; Kovács, Zsófia E.; Kunst, Günther Karl; Kyselý, René; Linderholm, Anna; Maraoui-Telmini, Bouthéina; Marković, Nemanja; Morales-Muñiz, Arturo; Nabais, Mariana; O’Connor, Terry; Oueslati, Tarek; Quintana Morales, Eréndira M.; Pasda, Kerstin; Perera, Jude; Perera, Nimal; Radbauer, Silvia; Ramon, Joan; Rannamäe, Eve; Sanmartí Grego, Joan; Treasure, Edward; Valenzuela-Lamas, Silvia; van der Jagt, Inge; Van Neer, Wim; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Walker, Thomas; Wynne-Jones, Stephanie; Zeiler, Jørn; Dobney, Keith; Boivin, Nicole; Searle, Jeremy B.; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Krause, Johannes; Larson, Greger; Orton, David

(2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Yu, He
AU  - Jamieson, Alexandra
AU  - Hulme-Beaman, Ardern
AU  - Conroy, Chris J.
AU  - Knight, Becky
AU  - Speller, Camilla
AU  - Al-Jarah, Hiba
AU  - Eager, Heidi
AU  - Trinks, Alexandra
AU  - Adikari, Gamini
AU  - Baron, Henriette
AU  - Böhlendorf-Arslan, Beate
AU  - Bohingamuwa, Wijerathne
AU  - Crowther, Alison
AU  - Cucchi, Thomas
AU  - Esser, Kinie
AU  - Fleisher, Jeffrey
AU  - Gidney, Louisa
AU  - Gladilina, Elena
AU  - Gol’din, Pavel
AU  - Goodman, Steven M.
AU  - Hamilton-Dyer, Sheila
AU  - Helm, Richard
AU  - Hillman, Jesse C.
AU  - Kallala, Nabil
AU  - Kivikero, Hanna
AU  - Kovács, Zsófia E.
AU  - Kunst, Günther Karl
AU  - Kyselý, René
AU  - Linderholm, Anna
AU  - Maraoui-Telmini, Bouthéina
AU  - Marković, Nemanja
AU  - Morales-Muñiz, Arturo
AU  - Nabais, Mariana
AU  - O’Connor, Terry
AU  - Oueslati, Tarek
AU  - Quintana Morales, Eréndira M.
AU  - Pasda, Kerstin
AU  - Perera, Jude
AU  - Perera, Nimal
AU  - Radbauer, Silvia
AU  - Ramon, Joan
AU  - Rannamäe, Eve
AU  - Sanmartí Grego, Joan
AU  - Treasure, Edward
AU  - Valenzuela-Lamas, Silvia
AU  - van der Jagt, Inge
AU  - Van Neer, Wim
AU  - Vigne, Jean-Denis
AU  - Walker, Thomas
AU  - Wynne-Jones, Stephanie
AU  - Zeiler, Jørn
AU  - Dobney, Keith
AU  - Boivin, Nicole
AU  - Searle, Jeremy B.
AU  - Krause-Kyora, Ben
AU  - Krause, Johannes
AU  - Larson, Greger
AU  - Orton, David
PY  - 2022
UR  - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-30009-z
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/414
AB  - The distribution of the black rat (Rattus rattus) has been heavily influenced by its association with humans. The dispersal history of this non-native commensal rodent across Europe, however, remains poorly understood, and different introductions may have occurred during the Roman and medieval periods. Here, in order to reconstruct the population history of European black rats, we first generate a de novo genome assembly of the black rat. We then sequence 67 ancient and three modern black rat mitogenomes, and 36 ancient and three modern nuclear genomes from archaeological sites spanning the 1st-17th centuries CE in Europe and North Africa. Analyses of our newly reported sequences, together with published mitochondrial DNA sequences, confirm that black rats were introduced into the Mediterranean and Europe from Southwest Asia. Genomic analyses of the ancient rats reveal a population turnover in temperate Europe between the 6th and 10th centuries CE, coincident with an archaeologically attested decline in the black rat population. The near disappearance and re-emergence of black rats in Europe may have been the result of the breakdown of the Roman Empire, the First Plague Pandemic, and/or post-Roman climatic cooling.
T2  - Nature Communications
T1  - Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history
IS  - 1
SP  - 2399
VL  - 13
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Yu, He and Jamieson, Alexandra and Hulme-Beaman, Ardern and Conroy, Chris J. and Knight, Becky and Speller, Camilla and Al-Jarah, Hiba and Eager, Heidi and Trinks, Alexandra and Adikari, Gamini and Baron, Henriette and Böhlendorf-Arslan, Beate and Bohingamuwa, Wijerathne and Crowther, Alison and Cucchi, Thomas and Esser, Kinie and Fleisher, Jeffrey and Gidney, Louisa and Gladilina, Elena and Gol’din, Pavel and Goodman, Steven M. and Hamilton-Dyer, Sheila and Helm, Richard and Hillman, Jesse C. and Kallala, Nabil and Kivikero, Hanna and Kovács, Zsófia E. and Kunst, Günther Karl and Kyselý, René and Linderholm, Anna and Maraoui-Telmini, Bouthéina and Marković, Nemanja and Morales-Muñiz, Arturo and Nabais, Mariana and O’Connor, Terry and Oueslati, Tarek and Quintana Morales, Eréndira M. and Pasda, Kerstin and Perera, Jude and Perera, Nimal and Radbauer, Silvia and Ramon, Joan and Rannamäe, Eve and Sanmartí Grego, Joan and Treasure, Edward and Valenzuela-Lamas, Silvia and van der Jagt, Inge and Van Neer, Wim and Vigne, Jean-Denis and Walker, Thomas and Wynne-Jones, Stephanie and Zeiler, Jørn and Dobney, Keith and Boivin, Nicole and Searle, Jeremy B. and Krause-Kyora, Ben and Krause, Johannes and Larson, Greger and Orton, David",
year = "2022",
abstract = "The distribution of the black rat (Rattus rattus) has been heavily influenced by its association with humans. The dispersal history of this non-native commensal rodent across Europe, however, remains poorly understood, and different introductions may have occurred during the Roman and medieval periods. Here, in order to reconstruct the population history of European black rats, we first generate a de novo genome assembly of the black rat. We then sequence 67 ancient and three modern black rat mitogenomes, and 36 ancient and three modern nuclear genomes from archaeological sites spanning the 1st-17th centuries CE in Europe and North Africa. Analyses of our newly reported sequences, together with published mitochondrial DNA sequences, confirm that black rats were introduced into the Mediterranean and Europe from Southwest Asia. Genomic analyses of the ancient rats reveal a population turnover in temperate Europe between the 6th and 10th centuries CE, coincident with an archaeologically attested decline in the black rat population. The near disappearance and re-emergence of black rats in Europe may have been the result of the breakdown of the Roman Empire, the First Plague Pandemic, and/or post-Roman climatic cooling.",
journal = "Nature Communications",
title = "Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history",
number = "1",
pages = "2399",
volume = "13"
}
Yu, H., Jamieson, A., Hulme-Beaman, A., Conroy, C. J., Knight, B., Speller, C., Al-Jarah, H., Eager, H., Trinks, A., Adikari, G., Baron, H., Böhlendorf-Arslan, B., Bohingamuwa, W., Crowther, A., Cucchi, T., Esser, K., Fleisher, J., Gidney, L., Gladilina, E., Gol’din, P., Goodman, S. M., Hamilton-Dyer, S., Helm, R., Hillman, J. C., Kallala, N., Kivikero, H., Kovács, Z. E., Kunst, G. K., Kyselý, R., Linderholm, A., Maraoui-Telmini, B., Marković, N., Morales-Muñiz, A., Nabais, M., O’Connor, T., Oueslati, T., Quintana Morales, E. M., Pasda, K., Perera, J., Perera, N., Radbauer, S., Ramon, J., Rannamäe, E., Sanmartí Grego, J., Treasure, E., Valenzuela-Lamas, S., van der Jagt, I., Van Neer, W., Vigne, J., Walker, T., Wynne-Jones, S., Zeiler, J., Dobney, K., Boivin, N., Searle, J. B., Krause-Kyora, B., Krause, J., Larson, G.,& Orton, D.. (2022). Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history. in Nature Communications, 13(1), 2399.
Yu H, Jamieson A, Hulme-Beaman A, Conroy CJ, Knight B, Speller C, Al-Jarah H, Eager H, Trinks A, Adikari G, Baron H, Böhlendorf-Arslan B, Bohingamuwa W, Crowther A, Cucchi T, Esser K, Fleisher J, Gidney L, Gladilina E, Gol’din P, Goodman SM, Hamilton-Dyer S, Helm R, Hillman JC, Kallala N, Kivikero H, Kovács ZE, Kunst GK, Kyselý R, Linderholm A, Maraoui-Telmini B, Marković N, Morales-Muñiz A, Nabais M, O’Connor T, Oueslati T, Quintana Morales EM, Pasda K, Perera J, Perera N, Radbauer S, Ramon J, Rannamäe E, Sanmartí Grego J, Treasure E, Valenzuela-Lamas S, van der Jagt I, Van Neer W, Vigne J, Walker T, Wynne-Jones S, Zeiler J, Dobney K, Boivin N, Searle JB, Krause-Kyora B, Krause J, Larson G, Orton D. Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history. in Nature Communications. 2022;13(1):2399..
Yu, He, Jamieson, Alexandra, Hulme-Beaman, Ardern, Conroy, Chris J., Knight, Becky, Speller, Camilla, Al-Jarah, Hiba, Eager, Heidi, Trinks, Alexandra, Adikari, Gamini, Baron, Henriette, Böhlendorf-Arslan, Beate, Bohingamuwa, Wijerathne, Crowther, Alison, Cucchi, Thomas, Esser, Kinie, Fleisher, Jeffrey, Gidney, Louisa, Gladilina, Elena, Gol’din, Pavel, Goodman, Steven M., Hamilton-Dyer, Sheila, Helm, Richard, Hillman, Jesse C., Kallala, Nabil, Kivikero, Hanna, Kovács, Zsófia E., Kunst, Günther Karl, Kyselý, René, Linderholm, Anna, Maraoui-Telmini, Bouthéina, Marković, Nemanja, Morales-Muñiz, Arturo, Nabais, Mariana, O’Connor, Terry, Oueslati, Tarek, Quintana Morales, Eréndira M., Pasda, Kerstin, Perera, Jude, Perera, Nimal, Radbauer, Silvia, Ramon, Joan, Rannamäe, Eve, Sanmartí Grego, Joan, Treasure, Edward, Valenzuela-Lamas, Silvia, van der Jagt, Inge, Van Neer, Wim, Vigne, Jean-Denis, Walker, Thomas, Wynne-Jones, Stephanie, Zeiler, Jørn, Dobney, Keith, Boivin, Nicole, Searle, Jeremy B., Krause-Kyora, Ben, Krause, Johannes, Larson, Greger, Orton, David, "Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history" in Nature Communications, 13, no. 1 (2022):2399.

Anthropologists at war?

Bošković, Aleksandar

(Wiley, 2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bošković, Aleksandar
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/415
AB  - Besides extensive human suffering and immense material destruction, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on 24 February revealed differences among anthropologists on how to grasp the logic and the causes of this war.1 It has uncovered some issues related to interpretation (as well as the limits of relativism) and raised questions concerning anthropologists’ ideas about their (and their professional associations) place in the contemporary world.
Anthropologists’ stances on war have a long history. In 1919, Sir Charles Read, the President of the Royal Anthropological Institute, started his Presidential address: ‘Of all the many kinds of social catastrophe due to human action, none is more subversive and disturbing than war’ (1919: 12). Another former President of the RAI, W.H.R. Rivers, treating soldiers suffering from what was later known as post-traumatic stress syndrome, claimed that the instinct for self-preservation is key to understanding human behaviour, a guide to the unconscious. This understanding led him to establish a new technique for treating these patients (Rivers 1919).
Another ancestor, Bronislaw Malinowski, writing over eight decades ago, proposed that ‘the task of evaluating war in terms of cultural analysis is today the main duty of the theory of civilization’ (1941: 522). Situations become especially problematic when we try to relate to the war in our own country (Greverus 1995) or when confronted with the violence waged by our own government (Günay 2013).
PB  - Wiley
T2  - Anthropology Today
T1  - Anthropologists at war?
EP  - 4
IS  - 3
SP  - 3
VL  - 38
DO  - 10.1111/1467-8322.12724
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Bošković, Aleksandar",
year = "2022",
abstract = "Besides extensive human suffering and immense material destruction, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on 24 February revealed differences among anthropologists on how to grasp the logic and the causes of this war.1 It has uncovered some issues related to interpretation (as well as the limits of relativism) and raised questions concerning anthropologists’ ideas about their (and their professional associations) place in the contemporary world.
Anthropologists’ stances on war have a long history. In 1919, Sir Charles Read, the President of the Royal Anthropological Institute, started his Presidential address: ‘Of all the many kinds of social catastrophe due to human action, none is more subversive and disturbing than war’ (1919: 12). Another former President of the RAI, W.H.R. Rivers, treating soldiers suffering from what was later known as post-traumatic stress syndrome, claimed that the instinct for self-preservation is key to understanding human behaviour, a guide to the unconscious. This understanding led him to establish a new technique for treating these patients (Rivers 1919).
Another ancestor, Bronislaw Malinowski, writing over eight decades ago, proposed that ‘the task of evaluating war in terms of cultural analysis is today the main duty of the theory of civilization’ (1941: 522). Situations become especially problematic when we try to relate to the war in our own country (Greverus 1995) or when confronted with the violence waged by our own government (Günay 2013).",
publisher = "Wiley",
journal = "Anthropology Today",
title = "Anthropologists at war?",
pages = "4-3",
number = "3",
volume = "38",
doi = "10.1111/1467-8322.12724"
}
Bošković, A.. (2022). Anthropologists at war?. in Anthropology Today
Wiley., 38(3), 3-4.
https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8322.12724
Bošković A. Anthropologists at war?. in Anthropology Today. 2022;38(3):3-4.
doi:10.1111/1467-8322.12724 .
Bošković, Aleksandar, "Anthropologists at war?" in Anthropology Today, 38, no. 3 (2022):3-4,
https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8322.12724 . .
1

Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview

Vuković, Jasna; Bikić, Vesna

(University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philosophy, 2022)

TY  - CHAP
AU  - Vuković, Jasna
AU  - Bikić, Vesna
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/394
AB  - Pottery function and use are one of the most complex issues in pottery studies because they comprise the study of different interactions,behaviors, and activities related to ceramic vessels. In the early days ofarchaeology as a discipline, pottery studies were focused on the classification of pots and the establishment of sequences to understand chronological and spatial relations between pottery groups, as the most prominentmarkers of archaeological cultures. Therefore, pottery usage did not attract attention as an important segment of research, except in the earlydays of American archaeology: in the pioneering attempts of pottery classification, evidence of use, such as layers of soot suggesting cooking, weretaken into account (Nelson 1916). Apart from sporadic considerationsabout function, it was not until the ‘80s that studies of pottery functionachieved full recognition. It seems that stressing an obvious fact – thatthe pots are tools (Braun 1983), designed to be used (Skibo 2013, 27), wasnecessary to bring about a shift in considerations about pottery. With theseminal works of D. Hally (1983a,b, 1986), and especially of J. Skibo andM. Schiffer (Schiffer and Skibo 1987, 1989, 2008; Skibo 1992, 2013; Skiboand Blinman 1995), examination of pottery function was theoreticallygrounded, and its methods were fully established, including experimentaland ethnoarchaeological research. In the study of pottery function and use, making a division betweentwo aspects of function – intended and actual use, is of great importance,especially because focused studies aimed exclusively on pottery functionare still rare. Intended function refers to the technical choices potters make related to function (Skibo and Schiffer 2008, 18; Skibo 1992, 35-37; 2013,27) or, in other words, the determination of the suitability of ceramic vessels for specific functions depending on their performance characteristics.These are defined as the “behavioral capabilities that an artifact possess tofulfill its functions in a specific activity” (Schiffer and Skibo 1987, 599), oras the ability of a vessel “to do certain things” (Hally 1986, 268), and theyare mostly related to resistivity to mechanical and thermal stresses duringuse. These mechanical and physical properties depend on vessels’ formalattributes, usually recorded during pottery data processing: fabric, surfacetreatments and decoration, wall thickness, and shape.The significance of shapes was early recognized as important for theconsiderations about function (Linton 1944; cf. Hally 1983b). Some of theperformance characteristics are exclusively connected with vessel forms:capacity (Smith 1985, 273, table 11.2), stability, ease of access, and transportability (Shepard 1956, 237; Rice 1987, 225), among others. Contoursof the vessels’ walls also affect performance, especially its thermal properties: for example, the presence of a low neck – constriction – reducesevaporation and prevents boiling over, and is, therefore, suitable for simmering for longer periods (Smith 1985; Rice 1987, 240; cf. Vuković 2019a)in contrast to open pots, suitable for boiling. Metric parameters (height,volume, and rim, shoulder and base radii) and different indexes – calculated ratios between some of the metric parameters – were also examinedas important indicators of suitability for specific functions (Smith 1985;Hally 1986). Besides the fact that indexes enable strong empirical data,their numerical values are especially useful for comparative analyses ofdifferent assemblages or vessel classes.The potential function or suitability of a vessel for a specific functiondoes not reveal how the vessels were actually used. The actual functionrefers not only to traces of use – use alterations (use-wear and surfaceaccretions), but also to use-related activities, and it is based on the identification of traces and the examination of their distribution and frequency(Skibo 1992; 2013; for an overview, see Forte, this volume). Considerations of some kinds of surface attrition, i.e. mechanical damage, are alsouseful for the identification of re-use and extended use of pots.The analyses of function, including ethnoarchaeological research,were first developed to primarily understand prehistoric pottery. In contrast to assemblages from prehistoric sites, considerations about potteryfunction within the ceramic assemblages from the historical periods arequite rare. Due to many primary sources, which contain data on vesseltypes and their use, the course of ceramic studies was mainly based onissues of typology, production centers, especially in the case of fine wares,and chronology, both of individual types and whole assemblages. Therefore, the issues of function were approached primarily from the aspect offormal attributes and morphology. Along with the shape and wall curvature, much attention was paid to the fabric, i.e. the types of inclusions, andthickness of the vessel walls, as clear indicators of their function.Among the pottery assemblages from historical periods, namely, theClassical era, use-wear analyses were sporadically done. In this regard,Margaret Ward’s (1993) functional analysis of terra sigillata (Samian ware)from the Roman fort at Piercebridge (United Kingdom) is rather representative. The Samian ware collection revealed evidence of frequent andextended use, most probably in a process of mixing ingredients (spices),based on the presence of heavy abrasion on the bases and walls (Ward1993, 19; Peña 2007, 60, Fig. 4.2). The function of Batavian hand-madepottery in the Roman military context of the Augustan castrum in Nijmegen (Netherlands) was also examined (Stoffels 2009, 147-149). Basedon the presence of soot and secondary burning, it was established thatthese pots had actually been used as cooking pots. The presence of twoother functional groups (tableware and storage), and the spatial distribution of vessels, suggest the usage of locally made pottery for cooking,presumably to fulfill the eating habits of the native Batavian auxiliary soldiers in the Roman fort (Stoffels 2009, 153). On the other hand, P. Arthur(2007b) examined cooking-pot types in relation to food resources, including archaeozoological and archaeobotanical remains, to determine thedistribution and application of different cooking techniques in the centuries between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. He put forwardan interesting thesis that a change in cooking pots, from predominantlyclosed with flat bases to predominantly open forms with convex bases,should be seen as a consequence not only of regionally available meat,cereals, and vegetables but also migrations of people, that is, a culture offood preparation and cooking habits. A similar assumption was made inthe case of tableware, primarily African Red Slip ware, which changed interms of size and typology during the same period. However, the use ofceramic vessels in historic sources, i.e. old cooking texts, challenges Arthur’s model due to a different nomenclature, primarily when it comes tothe function of olla and caccabus (Donelly 2015, 143–144). On the otherhand, during the 5th and 6th centuries, a decrease in the variety of potterytypes, i.e. profiles and sizes (volumes), was recorded. This was largely dueto the economic regression and the disappearance of large-scale potteryproduction (Arthur 2007a, 164-165). This phenomenon, clearly visible inthe archaeological record, coincides with the data in the texts. Nevertheless, Arthur’s model showed that cooking pots can be evidence of cultural(gastronomic) boundaries in antiquity, although due to the unreliability of his conclusions, it was suggested that other methods should be included,primarily analyses of use-alterations and residue analyses (Arthur 2007b,146). Concerning the modes of cooking in late antique pottery, according to the distribution of sooting clouds, it was assumed that pots withrounded bottoms were probably placed on some kind of metal base, trivet,or grid that allowed equal heat distribution, while closed, flat-based cooking-pots were placed by the fire and in front of the hearth or stove; theirthin walls allowed heat to be distributed more evenly on one side without constant mixing (Vroom 2008, 299–301, Figs. 13,15). In contrast, latemedieval cooking-pots, glazed as well as unglazed, exhibit visible sootingclouds on the outside. Although it was suggested that they were placeddirectly in the fire (Vroom 2004, 286), these use-accretions rather indicatethe position of the pot at a distance from the heat source.In early medieval archaeology, the need to examine pottery from theaspect of use was first recognized in the research of the old Slavic settlements. Excavations in Central Europe in the 1970s and ‘80s yielded,among other things, large ceramic assemblages containing whole vessels.They provided a deeper insight into the technological style, but also theuse of pottery in the early Middle Ages. One of the best examples is thesite of Březno near Louny (Czech Republic), a Slavic settlement dated tothe 9th century. Relying on ethnographic studies, an extensive experimentfocused on building old Slavic huts and living in them, including foodpreparation, was conducted (Pleinerová 1986; Pleinerová and Neustupny1987). The research revealed that the pots were placed in front of the ovenopening because of the need for frequent stirring; therefore, half of thecooking pot was exposed to open fire. Additionally, the correlation between mode of use of certain oven types, cooking technique, and the formand size of the vessels was established (Curta 2001, 286, 289–290), revealing some aspects of the household organization of old Slavic communities.Finally, secondary use, reuse, and recycling are important parts ofthe artifacts’ life cycles (Schiffer 1987, 13-15, 271) or use-lives. Reuse – achange in the user or use or form of an artifact following its initial use(Schiffer 1987, 28), or use of an object in a secondary context when it canno longer serve its original function (Deal and Hagstrum 1995, 111), arean important part of dynamic interactions between people and pottery, aswell as an important aspect of formation processes. Recycling – the returnof the artifact to the manufacturing process (Schiffer 1987, 28-32), in thecase of pottery needed to be redefined, and it was proposed that recyclingshould refer to the usage of fragments of pots, as tools, building material,or raw material (Vuković 2015). Important ethnoarchaeological research(Deal 1998) revealed the complexity of ceramic vessels’ use-lives, but theseissues were more rarely examined on pottery revealed from archaeological contexts (for example Sullivan 1989). The usage of ceramic sherds astools attracted some more attention in the research of archeological assemblages (López Varela et al. 2002; Van Gijn and Hofman 2008). An extremely important contribution regarding these stages of vessels’ use-liveswas made by T. Peña (2007), who examined numerous secondary uses ofRoman amphorae, including their reuse in burial customs, and the recycling of their fragments (props for cooking vessels, tools, gaming pieces,weights, etc.).The issue of extended use is usually connected with repairs of thepots. The most frequent ways of mending ceramic vessels were makingperforations along the breakage, and tying together the vessels’ fragmentswith some kind of string, rope, and even with metal wire (Dooijes andNieuwenhuyse 2007, 2009). Roman terra sigillata, for example, was oftenrepaired with rivets and staples (Ward 1993, 19–20), while amphorae weremended using the hole and clamp technique with the use of lead (Peña2007, 237–249) or by filling the cracks with wax, resin, gypsum, crushedceramics or glass, using animal glue, beeswax, or pine resin as adhesives(e.g. 213-215). The repairing of pots was usually connected to their highvalue, and a statistical method, the so-called frequency-of-mending (FreqMend), describing the frequency of repair per pottery type, was developed(Senior 1995). This is why analyses of secondary use, reuse, and extendeduse reveal a deeper insight into lifestyles and common practices of communities of the past.
PB  - University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philosophy
PB  - Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade
T2  - Pottery Function and Use: A Diachronic Perspective
T1  - Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview
EP  - 67
SP  - 37
ER  - 
@inbook{
author = "Vuković, Jasna and Bikić, Vesna",
year = "2022",
abstract = "Pottery function and use are one of the most complex issues in pottery studies because they comprise the study of different interactions,behaviors, and activities related to ceramic vessels. In the early days ofarchaeology as a discipline, pottery studies were focused on the classification of pots and the establishment of sequences to understand chronological and spatial relations between pottery groups, as the most prominentmarkers of archaeological cultures. Therefore, pottery usage did not attract attention as an important segment of research, except in the earlydays of American archaeology: in the pioneering attempts of pottery classification, evidence of use, such as layers of soot suggesting cooking, weretaken into account (Nelson 1916). Apart from sporadic considerationsabout function, it was not until the ‘80s that studies of pottery functionachieved full recognition. It seems that stressing an obvious fact – thatthe pots are tools (Braun 1983), designed to be used (Skibo 2013, 27), wasnecessary to bring about a shift in considerations about pottery. With theseminal works of D. Hally (1983a,b, 1986), and especially of J. Skibo andM. Schiffer (Schiffer and Skibo 1987, 1989, 2008; Skibo 1992, 2013; Skiboand Blinman 1995), examination of pottery function was theoreticallygrounded, and its methods were fully established, including experimentaland ethnoarchaeological research. In the study of pottery function and use, making a division betweentwo aspects of function – intended and actual use, is of great importance,especially because focused studies aimed exclusively on pottery functionare still rare. Intended function refers to the technical choices potters make related to function (Skibo and Schiffer 2008, 18; Skibo 1992, 35-37; 2013,27) or, in other words, the determination of the suitability of ceramic vessels for specific functions depending on their performance characteristics.These are defined as the “behavioral capabilities that an artifact possess tofulfill its functions in a specific activity” (Schiffer and Skibo 1987, 599), oras the ability of a vessel “to do certain things” (Hally 1986, 268), and theyare mostly related to resistivity to mechanical and thermal stresses duringuse. These mechanical and physical properties depend on vessels’ formalattributes, usually recorded during pottery data processing: fabric, surfacetreatments and decoration, wall thickness, and shape.The significance of shapes was early recognized as important for theconsiderations about function (Linton 1944; cf. Hally 1983b). Some of theperformance characteristics are exclusively connected with vessel forms:capacity (Smith 1985, 273, table 11.2), stability, ease of access, and transportability (Shepard 1956, 237; Rice 1987, 225), among others. Contoursof the vessels’ walls also affect performance, especially its thermal properties: for example, the presence of a low neck – constriction – reducesevaporation and prevents boiling over, and is, therefore, suitable for simmering for longer periods (Smith 1985; Rice 1987, 240; cf. Vuković 2019a)in contrast to open pots, suitable for boiling. Metric parameters (height,volume, and rim, shoulder and base radii) and different indexes – calculated ratios between some of the metric parameters – were also examinedas important indicators of suitability for specific functions (Smith 1985;Hally 1986). Besides the fact that indexes enable strong empirical data,their numerical values are especially useful for comparative analyses ofdifferent assemblages or vessel classes.The potential function or suitability of a vessel for a specific functiondoes not reveal how the vessels were actually used. The actual functionrefers not only to traces of use – use alterations (use-wear and surfaceaccretions), but also to use-related activities, and it is based on the identification of traces and the examination of their distribution and frequency(Skibo 1992; 2013; for an overview, see Forte, this volume). Considerations of some kinds of surface attrition, i.e. mechanical damage, are alsouseful for the identification of re-use and extended use of pots.The analyses of function, including ethnoarchaeological research,were first developed to primarily understand prehistoric pottery. In contrast to assemblages from prehistoric sites, considerations about potteryfunction within the ceramic assemblages from the historical periods arequite rare. Due to many primary sources, which contain data on vesseltypes and their use, the course of ceramic studies was mainly based onissues of typology, production centers, especially in the case of fine wares,and chronology, both of individual types and whole assemblages. Therefore, the issues of function were approached primarily from the aspect offormal attributes and morphology. Along with the shape and wall curvature, much attention was paid to the fabric, i.e. the types of inclusions, andthickness of the vessel walls, as clear indicators of their function.Among the pottery assemblages from historical periods, namely, theClassical era, use-wear analyses were sporadically done. In this regard,Margaret Ward’s (1993) functional analysis of terra sigillata (Samian ware)from the Roman fort at Piercebridge (United Kingdom) is rather representative. The Samian ware collection revealed evidence of frequent andextended use, most probably in a process of mixing ingredients (spices),based on the presence of heavy abrasion on the bases and walls (Ward1993, 19; Peña 2007, 60, Fig. 4.2). The function of Batavian hand-madepottery in the Roman military context of the Augustan castrum in Nijmegen (Netherlands) was also examined (Stoffels 2009, 147-149). Basedon the presence of soot and secondary burning, it was established thatthese pots had actually been used as cooking pots. The presence of twoother functional groups (tableware and storage), and the spatial distribution of vessels, suggest the usage of locally made pottery for cooking,presumably to fulfill the eating habits of the native Batavian auxiliary soldiers in the Roman fort (Stoffels 2009, 153). On the other hand, P. Arthur(2007b) examined cooking-pot types in relation to food resources, including archaeozoological and archaeobotanical remains, to determine thedistribution and application of different cooking techniques in the centuries between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. He put forwardan interesting thesis that a change in cooking pots, from predominantlyclosed with flat bases to predominantly open forms with convex bases,should be seen as a consequence not only of regionally available meat,cereals, and vegetables but also migrations of people, that is, a culture offood preparation and cooking habits. A similar assumption was made inthe case of tableware, primarily African Red Slip ware, which changed interms of size and typology during the same period. However, the use ofceramic vessels in historic sources, i.e. old cooking texts, challenges Arthur’s model due to a different nomenclature, primarily when it comes tothe function of olla and caccabus (Donelly 2015, 143–144). On the otherhand, during the 5th and 6th centuries, a decrease in the variety of potterytypes, i.e. profiles and sizes (volumes), was recorded. This was largely dueto the economic regression and the disappearance of large-scale potteryproduction (Arthur 2007a, 164-165). This phenomenon, clearly visible inthe archaeological record, coincides with the data in the texts. Nevertheless, Arthur’s model showed that cooking pots can be evidence of cultural(gastronomic) boundaries in antiquity, although due to the unreliability of his conclusions, it was suggested that other methods should be included,primarily analyses of use-alterations and residue analyses (Arthur 2007b,146). Concerning the modes of cooking in late antique pottery, according to the distribution of sooting clouds, it was assumed that pots withrounded bottoms were probably placed on some kind of metal base, trivet,or grid that allowed equal heat distribution, while closed, flat-based cooking-pots were placed by the fire and in front of the hearth or stove; theirthin walls allowed heat to be distributed more evenly on one side without constant mixing (Vroom 2008, 299–301, Figs. 13,15). In contrast, latemedieval cooking-pots, glazed as well as unglazed, exhibit visible sootingclouds on the outside. Although it was suggested that they were placeddirectly in the fire (Vroom 2004, 286), these use-accretions rather indicatethe position of the pot at a distance from the heat source.In early medieval archaeology, the need to examine pottery from theaspect of use was first recognized in the research of the old Slavic settlements. Excavations in Central Europe in the 1970s and ‘80s yielded,among other things, large ceramic assemblages containing whole vessels.They provided a deeper insight into the technological style, but also theuse of pottery in the early Middle Ages. One of the best examples is thesite of Březno near Louny (Czech Republic), a Slavic settlement dated tothe 9th century. Relying on ethnographic studies, an extensive experimentfocused on building old Slavic huts and living in them, including foodpreparation, was conducted (Pleinerová 1986; Pleinerová and Neustupny1987). The research revealed that the pots were placed in front of the ovenopening because of the need for frequent stirring; therefore, half of thecooking pot was exposed to open fire. Additionally, the correlation between mode of use of certain oven types, cooking technique, and the formand size of the vessels was established (Curta 2001, 286, 289–290), revealing some aspects of the household organization of old Slavic communities.Finally, secondary use, reuse, and recycling are important parts ofthe artifacts’ life cycles (Schiffer 1987, 13-15, 271) or use-lives. Reuse – achange in the user or use or form of an artifact following its initial use(Schiffer 1987, 28), or use of an object in a secondary context when it canno longer serve its original function (Deal and Hagstrum 1995, 111), arean important part of dynamic interactions between people and pottery, aswell as an important aspect of formation processes. Recycling – the returnof the artifact to the manufacturing process (Schiffer 1987, 28-32), in thecase of pottery needed to be redefined, and it was proposed that recyclingshould refer to the usage of fragments of pots, as tools, building material,or raw material (Vuković 2015). Important ethnoarchaeological research(Deal 1998) revealed the complexity of ceramic vessels’ use-lives, but theseissues were more rarely examined on pottery revealed from archaeological contexts (for example Sullivan 1989). The usage of ceramic sherds astools attracted some more attention in the research of archeological assemblages (López Varela et al. 2002; Van Gijn and Hofman 2008). An extremely important contribution regarding these stages of vessels’ use-liveswas made by T. Peña (2007), who examined numerous secondary uses ofRoman amphorae, including their reuse in burial customs, and the recycling of their fragments (props for cooking vessels, tools, gaming pieces,weights, etc.).The issue of extended use is usually connected with repairs of thepots. The most frequent ways of mending ceramic vessels were makingperforations along the breakage, and tying together the vessels’ fragmentswith some kind of string, rope, and even with metal wire (Dooijes andNieuwenhuyse 2007, 2009). Roman terra sigillata, for example, was oftenrepaired with rivets and staples (Ward 1993, 19–20), while amphorae weremended using the hole and clamp technique with the use of lead (Peña2007, 237–249) or by filling the cracks with wax, resin, gypsum, crushedceramics or glass, using animal glue, beeswax, or pine resin as adhesives(e.g. 213-215). The repairing of pots was usually connected to their highvalue, and a statistical method, the so-called frequency-of-mending (FreqMend), describing the frequency of repair per pottery type, was developed(Senior 1995). This is why analyses of secondary use, reuse, and extendeduse reveal a deeper insight into lifestyles and common practices of communities of the past.",
publisher = "University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philosophy, Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade",
journal = "Pottery Function and Use: A Diachronic Perspective",
booktitle = "Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview",
pages = "67-37"
}
Vuković, J.,& Bikić, V.. (2022). Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview. in Pottery Function and Use: A Diachronic Perspective
University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philosophy., 37-67.
Vuković J, Bikić V. Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview. in Pottery Function and Use: A Diachronic Perspective. 2022;:37-67..
Vuković, Jasna, Bikić, Vesna, "Pottery Function in the Archaeology of the Continental Balkans: An Overview" in Pottery Function and Use: A Diachronic Perspective (2022):37-67.

Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans

Gavranović, Mario; Mehofer, Mathias; Kapuran, Aleksandar; Koledin, J.; Mitrović, Jovan D.; Papazovska, A.; Pravidur, A.; Orđević, A.; Jacanović, D.

(Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Gavranović, Mario
AU  - Mehofer, Mathias
AU  - Kapuran, Aleksandar
AU  - Koledin, J.
AU  - Mitrović, Jovan D.
AU  - Papazovska, A.
AU  - Pravidur, A.
AU  - Orđević, A.
AU  - Jacanović, D.
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/393
AB  - In this paper we present the first results of an interdisciplinary research project focused on Late Bronze Age metallurgy in the western and central Balkans. The comprehensive chemical and lead isotope analysis, and a strict consideration of archaeological criteria, has provided a deeper insight into supra regional metal exchange networks between the 14th and 9th century BC in this part of Europe. Particularly interesting and surprising are results regarding the provenance of raw materials for copper production, which have a chemical composition and lead isotope ratios that closely correspond to ore deposits in the southern Alps (North Italy). Based on the examination of 57 objects of different functions, chronology and distribution, it becomes apparent that copper from the southern Alps was almost an omnipresent raw material in the territories of the western and central Balkans with only a few finds from North Macedonia to indicate alternative sources. The analyses demonstrate that the reuse of fahlore-based copper is attested for the first time in the regions under study. The remarkable fact that other archaeological parameters do not indicate such an intensive connection between the Balkan area and Northern Italy raises a number of questions. The sustained and long-lasting networks of raw material procurement stand in contrast to the expected cultural interaction between metal producing and metal consuming prehistoric societies. The results of this work also highlight the currently underestimated role of the southern Alps as one of the main copper producing areas in Bronze Age Europe, and demonstrate for the first time that the region of western and central Balkans was one of the major recipients.
PB  - Public Library of Science (PLoS)
T2  - PLoS One
T1  - Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans
IS  - 3 March
VL  - 17
DO  - 10.1371/journal.pone.0263823
UR  - conv_429
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Gavranović, Mario and Mehofer, Mathias and Kapuran, Aleksandar and Koledin, J. and Mitrović, Jovan D. and Papazovska, A. and Pravidur, A. and Orđević, A. and Jacanović, D.",
year = "2022",
abstract = "In this paper we present the first results of an interdisciplinary research project focused on Late Bronze Age metallurgy in the western and central Balkans. The comprehensive chemical and lead isotope analysis, and a strict consideration of archaeological criteria, has provided a deeper insight into supra regional metal exchange networks between the 14th and 9th century BC in this part of Europe. Particularly interesting and surprising are results regarding the provenance of raw materials for copper production, which have a chemical composition and lead isotope ratios that closely correspond to ore deposits in the southern Alps (North Italy). Based on the examination of 57 objects of different functions, chronology and distribution, it becomes apparent that copper from the southern Alps was almost an omnipresent raw material in the territories of the western and central Balkans with only a few finds from North Macedonia to indicate alternative sources. The analyses demonstrate that the reuse of fahlore-based copper is attested for the first time in the regions under study. The remarkable fact that other archaeological parameters do not indicate such an intensive connection between the Balkan area and Northern Italy raises a number of questions. The sustained and long-lasting networks of raw material procurement stand in contrast to the expected cultural interaction between metal producing and metal consuming prehistoric societies. The results of this work also highlight the currently underestimated role of the southern Alps as one of the main copper producing areas in Bronze Age Europe, and demonstrate for the first time that the region of western and central Balkans was one of the major recipients.",
publisher = "Public Library of Science (PLoS)",
journal = "PLoS One",
title = "Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans",
number = "3 March",
volume = "17",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0263823",
url = "conv_429"
}
Gavranović, M., Mehofer, M., Kapuran, A., Koledin, J., Mitrović, J. D., Papazovska, A., Pravidur, A., Orđević, A.,& Jacanović, D.. (2022). Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans. in PLoS One
Public Library of Science (PLoS)., 17(3 March).
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0263823
conv_429
Gavranović M, Mehofer M, Kapuran A, Koledin J, Mitrović JD, Papazovska A, Pravidur A, Orđević A, Jacanović D. Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans. in PLoS One. 2022;17(3 March).
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0263823
conv_429 .
Gavranović, Mario, Mehofer, Mathias, Kapuran, Aleksandar, Koledin, J., Mitrović, Jovan D., Papazovska, A., Pravidur, A., Orđević, A., Jacanović, D., "Emergence of monopoly–Copper exchange networks during the Late Bronze Age in the western and central Balkans" in PLoS One, 17, no. 3 March (2022),
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0263823 .,
conv_429 .
27

Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia

Bulatović, Jelena; Marković, Nemanja; Krstić, Nikola; Bulatović, Aleksandar; Mitrović, Marko; Marinković, Darko

(Wiley, Hoboken, 2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bulatović, Jelena
AU  - Marković, Nemanja
AU  - Krstić, Nikola
AU  - Bulatović, Aleksandar
AU  - Mitrović, Marko
AU  - Marinković, Darko
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/392
AB  - This paper aims to present the first evidence of animal diseases from the Central Balkan Eneolithic, a prehistoric period that lasted about 2000 years. The eponymous site of Bubanj in south-eastern Serbia provided a diachronic perspective on animal pathologies developing during this long time period. We analyzed 71 animal remains showing evidence of pathological changes. All of the remains exhibiting anomalies were subjected to macroscopic analysis, while the specimens with the most prominent alterations also underwent X-ray and CT imaging. Anomalies were observed mostly in domestic animals. Only in caprines were all of the different types of anomalies present, with dental pathologies being the most frequent. Degenerative bone alterations were noted in around 78% of the domestic cattle specimens, while congenital anomalies were the most common type in domestic pigs. Pathological changes were also noted in dogs, aurochs, red deer, wild boars, beavers, and bears. In most cases, the anomalies were caused by hereditary and environmental factors. Caprine dental pathologies were the result of aging and poor-quality nutrition. In domestic cattle, besides being caused by environmental factors, the degenerative alterations might also have been work related. The lack of paleopathological data from other Eneolithic sites in the region, and the scarce or non-existent evidence from the previous (Neolithic) and succeeding (Bronze Age) periods prevented comparative analyses and discussion of the results within wider temporal and spatial frames. Establishing a paleopathological investigation of animal remains with anomalies from the prehistoric Central Balkans should be a standard, in order to provide us with a better understanding of human-animal interactions.
PB  - Wiley, Hoboken
T2  - International Journal of Osteoarchaeology
T1  - Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia
DO  - 10.1002/oa.3065
UR  - conv_315
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Bulatović, Jelena and Marković, Nemanja and Krstić, Nikola and Bulatović, Aleksandar and Mitrović, Marko and Marinković, Darko",
year = "2022",
abstract = "This paper aims to present the first evidence of animal diseases from the Central Balkan Eneolithic, a prehistoric period that lasted about 2000 years. The eponymous site of Bubanj in south-eastern Serbia provided a diachronic perspective on animal pathologies developing during this long time period. We analyzed 71 animal remains showing evidence of pathological changes. All of the remains exhibiting anomalies were subjected to macroscopic analysis, while the specimens with the most prominent alterations also underwent X-ray and CT imaging. Anomalies were observed mostly in domestic animals. Only in caprines were all of the different types of anomalies present, with dental pathologies being the most frequent. Degenerative bone alterations were noted in around 78% of the domestic cattle specimens, while congenital anomalies were the most common type in domestic pigs. Pathological changes were also noted in dogs, aurochs, red deer, wild boars, beavers, and bears. In most cases, the anomalies were caused by hereditary and environmental factors. Caprine dental pathologies were the result of aging and poor-quality nutrition. In domestic cattle, besides being caused by environmental factors, the degenerative alterations might also have been work related. The lack of paleopathological data from other Eneolithic sites in the region, and the scarce or non-existent evidence from the previous (Neolithic) and succeeding (Bronze Age) periods prevented comparative analyses and discussion of the results within wider temporal and spatial frames. Establishing a paleopathological investigation of animal remains with anomalies from the prehistoric Central Balkans should be a standard, in order to provide us with a better understanding of human-animal interactions.",
publisher = "Wiley, Hoboken",
journal = "International Journal of Osteoarchaeology",
title = "Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia",
doi = "10.1002/oa.3065",
url = "conv_315"
}
Bulatović, J., Marković, N., Krstić, N., Bulatović, A., Mitrović, M.,& Marinković, D.. (2022). Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia. in International Journal of Osteoarchaeology
Wiley, Hoboken..
https://doi.org/10.1002/oa.3065
conv_315
Bulatović J, Marković N, Krstić N, Bulatović A, Mitrović M, Marinković D. Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia. in International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. 2022;.
doi:10.1002/oa.3065
conv_315 .
Bulatović, Jelena, Marković, Nemanja, Krstić, Nikola, Bulatović, Aleksandar, Mitrović, Marko, Marinković, Darko, "Animal diseases in the Central Balkan Eneolithic (ca. 4500-2500 BC)-A diachronic perspective on the site of Bubanj, south-eastern Serbia" in International Journal of Osteoarchaeology (2022),
https://doi.org/10.1002/oa.3065 .,
conv_315 .
1

Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans

Borić, Dušan; Cristiani, Emanuela; Hopkins, Rachel; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Gerometta, Katarina; French, Charly A., I; Mutri, Giuseppina; Calić, Jelena; Dimitrijević, Vesna; Marin-Arroyo, Ana B.; Jones, Jennifer R.; Stevens, Rhiannon; Masciana, Alana; Uno, Kevin; Richter, Kristine Korzow; Antonović, Dragana; Wehr, Karol; Lane, Christine; White, Dustin

(Wiley, Hoboken, 2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Borić, Dušan
AU  - Cristiani, Emanuela
AU  - Hopkins, Rachel
AU  - Schwenninger, Jean-Luc
AU  - Gerometta, Katarina
AU  - French, Charly A., I
AU  - Mutri, Giuseppina
AU  - Calić, Jelena
AU  - Dimitrijević, Vesna
AU  - Marin-Arroyo, Ana B.
AU  - Jones, Jennifer R.
AU  - Stevens, Rhiannon
AU  - Masciana, Alana
AU  - Uno, Kevin
AU  - Richter, Kristine Korzow
AU  - Antonović, Dragana
AU  - Wehr, Karol
AU  - Lane, Christine
AU  - White, Dustin
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/391
AB  - The article presents evidence about the Middle Palaeolithic and Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition interval in the karst area of the Danube Gorges in the Lower Danube Basin. We review the extant data and present new evidence from two recently investigated sites found on the Serbian side of the Danube River - Tabula Traiana and Dubocka-Kozja caves. The two sites have yielded layers dating to both the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic and have been investigated by the application of modern standards of excavation and recovery along with a suite of state-of-the-art analytical procedures. The presentation focuses on micromorphological analyses of the caves' sediments, characterisation of cryptotephra, a suite of new radiometric dates (accelerator mass spectrometry and optically stimulated luminescence) as well as proteomics (zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry) and stable isotope data in discerning patterns of human occupation of these locales over the long term.
PB  - Wiley, Hoboken
T2  - Journal of Quaternary Science
T1  - Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans
EP  - 180
IS  - 2
SP  - 142
VL  - 37
DO  - 10.1002/jqs.3354
UR  - conv_332
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Borić, Dušan and Cristiani, Emanuela and Hopkins, Rachel and Schwenninger, Jean-Luc and Gerometta, Katarina and French, Charly A., I and Mutri, Giuseppina and Calić, Jelena and Dimitrijević, Vesna and Marin-Arroyo, Ana B. and Jones, Jennifer R. and Stevens, Rhiannon and Masciana, Alana and Uno, Kevin and Richter, Kristine Korzow and Antonović, Dragana and Wehr, Karol and Lane, Christine and White, Dustin",
year = "2022",
abstract = "The article presents evidence about the Middle Palaeolithic and Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition interval in the karst area of the Danube Gorges in the Lower Danube Basin. We review the extant data and present new evidence from two recently investigated sites found on the Serbian side of the Danube River - Tabula Traiana and Dubocka-Kozja caves. The two sites have yielded layers dating to both the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic and have been investigated by the application of modern standards of excavation and recovery along with a suite of state-of-the-art analytical procedures. The presentation focuses on micromorphological analyses of the caves' sediments, characterisation of cryptotephra, a suite of new radiometric dates (accelerator mass spectrometry and optically stimulated luminescence) as well as proteomics (zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry) and stable isotope data in discerning patterns of human occupation of these locales over the long term.",
publisher = "Wiley, Hoboken",
journal = "Journal of Quaternary Science",
title = "Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans",
pages = "180-142",
number = "2",
volume = "37",
doi = "10.1002/jqs.3354",
url = "conv_332"
}
Borić, D., Cristiani, E., Hopkins, R., Schwenninger, J., Gerometta, K., French, C. A., I., Mutri, G., Calić, J., Dimitrijević, V., Marin-Arroyo, A. B., Jones, J. R., Stevens, R., Masciana, A., Uno, K., Richter, K. K., Antonović, D., Wehr, K., Lane, C.,& White, D.. (2022). Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans. in Journal of Quaternary Science
Wiley, Hoboken., 37(2), 142-180.
https://doi.org/10.1002/jqs.3354
conv_332
Borić D, Cristiani E, Hopkins R, Schwenninger J, Gerometta K, French CAI, Mutri G, Calić J, Dimitrijević V, Marin-Arroyo AB, Jones JR, Stevens R, Masciana A, Uno K, Richter KK, Antonović D, Wehr K, Lane C, White D. Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans. in Journal of Quaternary Science. 2022;37(2):142-180.
doi:10.1002/jqs.3354
conv_332 .
Borić, Dušan, Cristiani, Emanuela, Hopkins, Rachel, Schwenninger, Jean-Luc, Gerometta, Katarina, French, Charly A., I, Mutri, Giuseppina, Calić, Jelena, Dimitrijević, Vesna, Marin-Arroyo, Ana B., Jones, Jennifer R., Stevens, Rhiannon, Masciana, Alana, Uno, Kevin, Richter, Kristine Korzow, Antonović, Dragana, Wehr, Karol, Lane, Christine, White, Dustin, "Neanderthals on the Lower Danube: Middle Palaeolithic evidence in the Danube Gorges of the Balkans" in Journal of Quaternary Science, 37, no. 2 (2022):142-180,
https://doi.org/10.1002/jqs.3354 .,
conv_332 .
21

Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables

de Vareilles, Anne; Filipović, Dragana; Obradović, Đurđa; Vander Linden, Marc

(Mdpi, Basel, 2022)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - de Vareilles, Anne
AU  - Filipović, Dragana
AU  - Obradović, Đurđa
AU  - Vander Linden, Marc
PY  - 2022
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/390
AB  - Agriculture is a complex and dynamic socio-ecological system shaped by environmental, economic, and social factors. The crop resource pool is its key component and one that best reflects environmental limitations and socio-economic concerns of the farmers. This pertains in particular to small-scale subsistence production, as was practised by Neolithic farmers. We investigated if and how the environment and cultural complexes shaped the spectrum and diversity of crops cultivated by Neolithic farmers in the central-western Balkans and on the Hungarian Plain. We did so by exploring patterns in crop diversity between biogeographical regions and cultural complexes using multivariate statistical analyses. We also examined the spectrum of wild-gathered plant resources in the same way. We found that the number of species in Neolithic plant assemblages is correlated with sampling intensity (the number and volume of samples), but that this applies to all archaeological cultures. Late Neolithic communities of the central and western Balkans exploited a large pool of plant resources, whose spectrum was somewhat different between archaeological cultures. By comparison, the earliest Neolithic tradition in the region, the Starcevo-Koros-Cris phenomenon, seems to have used a comparatively narrower range of crops and wild plants, as did the Linearbandkeramik culture on the Hungarian Plain.
PB  - Mdpi, Basel
T2  - Quaternary
T1  - Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables
IS  - 1
VL  - 5
DO  - 10.3390/quat5010006
UR  - conv_329
ER  - 
@article{
author = "de Vareilles, Anne and Filipović, Dragana and Obradović, Đurđa and Vander Linden, Marc",
year = "2022",
abstract = "Agriculture is a complex and dynamic socio-ecological system shaped by environmental, economic, and social factors. The crop resource pool is its key component and one that best reflects environmental limitations and socio-economic concerns of the farmers. This pertains in particular to small-scale subsistence production, as was practised by Neolithic farmers. We investigated if and how the environment and cultural complexes shaped the spectrum and diversity of crops cultivated by Neolithic farmers in the central-western Balkans and on the Hungarian Plain. We did so by exploring patterns in crop diversity between biogeographical regions and cultural complexes using multivariate statistical analyses. We also examined the spectrum of wild-gathered plant resources in the same way. We found that the number of species in Neolithic plant assemblages is correlated with sampling intensity (the number and volume of samples), but that this applies to all archaeological cultures. Late Neolithic communities of the central and western Balkans exploited a large pool of plant resources, whose spectrum was somewhat different between archaeological cultures. By comparison, the earliest Neolithic tradition in the region, the Starcevo-Koros-Cris phenomenon, seems to have used a comparatively narrower range of crops and wild plants, as did the Linearbandkeramik culture on the Hungarian Plain.",
publisher = "Mdpi, Basel",
journal = "Quaternary",
title = "Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables",
number = "1",
volume = "5",
doi = "10.3390/quat5010006",
url = "conv_329"
}
de Vareilles, A., Filipović, D., Obradović, Đ.,& Vander Linden, M.. (2022). Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables. in Quaternary
Mdpi, Basel., 5(1).
https://doi.org/10.3390/quat5010006
conv_329
de Vareilles A, Filipović D, Obradović Đ, Vander Linden M. Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables. in Quaternary. 2022;5(1).
doi:10.3390/quat5010006
conv_329 .
de Vareilles, Anne, Filipović, Dragana, Obradović, Đurđa, Vander Linden, Marc, "Along the Rivers and into the Plain: Early Crop Diversity in the Central and Western Balkans and Its Relationship with Environmental and Cultural Variables" in Quaternary, 5, no. 1 (2022),
https://doi.org/10.3390/quat5010006 .,
conv_329 .
1

Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]

Bošković, Aleksandar; Eriksen, Thomas Hylland

(University of Toronto Press, 2021)

TY  - CHAP
AU  - Bošković, Aleksandar
AU  - Eriksen, Thomas Hylland
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/385
AB  - There were several formative moments in the creation of this book [i.e., Other People’s Anthropologies]. First of all, the idea of organizing the workshop on “Other Anthropologies” at the 2004 EASA conference in Vienna was suggested by Thomas Hylland Eriksen, as we were walking through the High Street of Grahamstown (South Africa) on a windy Sunday morning in May 2003. The two day (10–11 September) and three session workshop in Vienna went extremely well, in terms of both attendance and the discussions. Many papers from this workshop (by Kuznetsov, Elchinova, Sugishita, and Guber) eventually made it into this book.
PB  - University of Toronto Press
T2  - Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, Sixth Edition
T1  - Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]
EP  - 514
SP  - 501
UR  - conv_448
ER  - 
@inbook{
author = "Bošković, Aleksandar and Eriksen, Thomas Hylland",
year = "2021",
abstract = "There were several formative moments in the creation of this book [i.e., Other People’s Anthropologies]. First of all, the idea of organizing the workshop on “Other Anthropologies” at the 2004 EASA conference in Vienna was suggested by Thomas Hylland Eriksen, as we were walking through the High Street of Grahamstown (South Africa) on a windy Sunday morning in May 2003. The two day (10–11 September) and three session workshop in Vienna went extremely well, in terms of both attendance and the discussions. Many papers from this workshop (by Kuznetsov, Elchinova, Sugishita, and Guber) eventually made it into this book.",
publisher = "University of Toronto Press",
journal = "Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, Sixth Edition",
booktitle = "Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]",
pages = "514-501",
url = "conv_448"
}
Bošković, A.,& Eriksen, T. H.. (2021). Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]. in Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, Sixth Edition
University of Toronto Press., 501-514.
conv_448
Bošković A, Eriksen TH. Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]. in Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, Sixth Edition. 2021;:501-514.
conv_448 .
Bošković, Aleksandar, Eriksen, Thomas Hylland, "Introduction: [Other People’s Anthropologies] [2008]" in Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, Sixth Edition (2021):501-514,
conv_448 .

The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans

Milanović, Dragan

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Milanović, Dragan
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/389
AB  - The importance of salt in human and animal diets suggests that the local resources of saline soils, watercourses, and marshes with saline water had to be well known to past populations. Based on the analysis of the environs of a large number of Late Neolithic and Early Eneolithic sites, this research assumes the great importance of such resources. This paper examines the spatial relationships between settlements and these resources, in the example of five Late Neolithic settlements from the territories of the Pannonian Plain and the Central Balkans. The goals of the research are to provide an initial step in the reconstruction of potential locations for salt exploitation, and provide a better understanding of each settlement and, subsequently, its role and function in the local Neolithic settlement system. The research considers previously published results of the pedological analysis of the settlement environments and archaeological investigations of the settlements. If certain micro-regions and regions did not provide possibilities for the extraction of salt for both animal and human utilisation, salt, and probably cattle, had to be procured through exchange networks. However, if livestock could not be grazed in areas abundant in salt, then salt would have to be added to the animals’ diet. We conclude that Late Neolithic settlements should not be observed in isolation, but rather аs parts of wider settlement systems including exchange networks with salt as a major commodity. This represents one of the crucial factors for the understanding of cultural development during the 5th millennium BC.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans
EP  - 19
IS  - 71
SP  - 7
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171007M
UR  - conv_454
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Milanović, Dragan",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The importance of salt in human and animal diets suggests that the local resources of saline soils, watercourses, and marshes with saline water had to be well known to past populations. Based on the analysis of the environs of a large number of Late Neolithic and Early Eneolithic sites, this research assumes the great importance of such resources. This paper examines the spatial relationships between settlements and these resources, in the example of five Late Neolithic settlements from the territories of the Pannonian Plain and the Central Balkans. The goals of the research are to provide an initial step in the reconstruction of potential locations for salt exploitation, and provide a better understanding of each settlement and, subsequently, its role and function in the local Neolithic settlement system. The research considers previously published results of the pedological analysis of the settlement environments and archaeological investigations of the settlements. If certain micro-regions and regions did not provide possibilities for the extraction of salt for both animal and human utilisation, salt, and probably cattle, had to be procured through exchange networks. However, if livestock could not be grazed in areas abundant in salt, then salt would have to be added to the animals’ diet. We conclude that Late Neolithic settlements should not be observed in isolation, but rather аs parts of wider settlement systems including exchange networks with salt as a major commodity. This represents one of the crucial factors for the understanding of cultural development during the 5th millennium BC.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans",
pages = "19-7",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171007M",
url = "conv_454"
}
Milanović, D.. (2021). The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 7-19.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171007M
conv_454
Milanović D. The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans. in Starinar. 2021;(71):7-19.
doi:10.2298/STA2171007M
conv_454 .
Milanović, Dragan, "The economic and social importance of saline soils and saltwaters during the late neolithic of the Pannonian plain and the central Balkans" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):7-19,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171007M .,
conv_454 .

Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat

Greenfield, H.J.; Kapuran, Aleksandar

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Greenfield, H.J.
AU  - Kapuran, Aleksandar
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/388
AB  - Systematic archaeological excavations at the multicultural site of Foeni-Sălaş in the Romanian Banat conducted during the first half of the 1990s uncovered evidence that the site was inhabited during the Early Neolithic, Copper, Bronze, Early Iron, Late Antique and Medieval Ages. This paper summarises the cultural history of the settlement at the site and describes the relevant deposits and material culture in each period.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat
EP  - 60
IS  - 71
SP  - 21
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171021G
UR  - conv_452
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Greenfield, H.J. and Kapuran, Aleksandar",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Systematic archaeological excavations at the multicultural site of Foeni-Sălaş in the Romanian Banat conducted during the first half of the 1990s uncovered evidence that the site was inhabited during the Early Neolithic, Copper, Bronze, Early Iron, Late Antique and Medieval Ages. This paper summarises the cultural history of the settlement at the site and describes the relevant deposits and material culture in each period.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat",
pages = "60-21",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171021G",
url = "conv_452"
}
Greenfield, H.J.,& Kapuran, A.. (2021). Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 21-60.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171021G
conv_452
Greenfield H, Kapuran A. Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat. in Starinar. 2021;(71):21-60.
doi:10.2298/STA2171021G
conv_452 .
Greenfield, H.J., Kapuran, Aleksandar, "Size doesn’t matter: Foeni-sălaş, a small multi-period settlement in the Romanian Banat" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):21-60,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171021G .,
conv_452 .

The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data

Bulatović, Aleksandar; Molloy, B.; Filipović, Vojislav

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bulatović, Aleksandar
AU  - Molloy, B.
AU  - Filipović, Vojislav
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/386
AB  - Alleged “Aegean migrations” have long been seen as underlying major transformations in lifeways and identity in the Balkans in the 12th–11th centuries BC. Revisiting the material culture and settlement changes in the north-south “routeway” of the Velika Morava–Južna Morava–Vardar/Axios river valleys, this paper evaluates developments within local communities. It is argued that mobility played an important role in social change, including an element of inward migration from the north. We argue that rather than an Aegean end point, these river valleys themselves were the destination of migrants. The prosperity this stimulated within those communities led to increased networks of personal mobility that incorporated elements from communities from the wider Carpathians and the north of Greece over the course of two centuries.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data
EP  - 105
IS  - 71
SP  - 61
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171061B
UR  - conv_450
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Bulatović, Aleksandar and Molloy, B. and Filipović, Vojislav",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Alleged “Aegean migrations” have long been seen as underlying major transformations in lifeways and identity in the Balkans in the 12th–11th centuries BC. Revisiting the material culture and settlement changes in the north-south “routeway” of the Velika Morava–Južna Morava–Vardar/Axios river valleys, this paper evaluates developments within local communities. It is argued that mobility played an important role in social change, including an element of inward migration from the north. We argue that rather than an Aegean end point, these river valleys themselves were the destination of migrants. The prosperity this stimulated within those communities led to increased networks of personal mobility that incorporated elements from communities from the wider Carpathians and the north of Greece over the course of two centuries.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data",
pages = "105-61",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171061B",
url = "conv_450"
}
Bulatović, A., Molloy, B.,& Filipović, V.. (2021). The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 61-105.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171061B
conv_450
Bulatović A, Molloy B, Filipović V. The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data. in Starinar. 2021;(71):61-105.
doi:10.2298/STA2171061B
conv_450 .
Bulatović, Aleksandar, Molloy, B., Filipović, Vojislav, "The Balkan Aegean migrations revisited: changes in material culture and settlement patterns in the late bronze age central Balkans in light of new data" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):61-105,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171061B .,
conv_450 .
1

Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium

Ilić, Olivera; Jovičić, Mladen

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ilić, Olivera
AU  - Jovičić, Mladen
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/387
AB  - The several decades long rescue excavations of the ancient city of Viminacium have brought to light a large number of finds with very varied functions. In this paper, we will focus our attention on the remains of agricultural tools. They can be grouped according to their application: tools for clearing plants and preparing the soil for cultivation, tools used for tillage, implements for shredding and preparation for planting, as well as those used for mowing, harvesting, soil cleaning, and haymaking. The finds of agricultural tools that we present in this paper, although small in number, represent the most reliable indicators of agricultural activities in the period from the 2nd to the beginning of the 4th century, when Viminacium went through its period of greatest prosperity.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium
EP  - 206
IS  - 71
SP  - 181
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171181I
UR  - conv_451
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ilić, Olivera and Jovičić, Mladen",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The several decades long rescue excavations of the ancient city of Viminacium have brought to light a large number of finds with very varied functions. In this paper, we will focus our attention on the remains of agricultural tools. They can be grouped according to their application: tools for clearing plants and preparing the soil for cultivation, tools used for tillage, implements for shredding and preparation for planting, as well as those used for mowing, harvesting, soil cleaning, and haymaking. The finds of agricultural tools that we present in this paper, although small in number, represent the most reliable indicators of agricultural activities in the period from the 2nd to the beginning of the 4th century, when Viminacium went through its period of greatest prosperity.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium",
pages = "206-181",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171181I",
url = "conv_451"
}
Ilić, O.,& Jovičić, M.. (2021). Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 181-206.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171181I
conv_451
Ilić O, Jovičić M. Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium. in Starinar. 2021;(71):181-206.
doi:10.2298/STA2171181I
conv_451 .
Ilić, Olivera, Jovičić, Mladen, "Roman agricultural tools in the ager of Viminacium" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):181-206,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171181I .,
conv_451 .

The blues of Romuliana

Jovanović, Sonja; Cholakova, Anastasia; Pop-Lazić, Stefan; Freestone, I.C.; Živković, M.

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Jovanović, Sonja
AU  - Cholakova, Anastasia
AU  - Pop-Lazić, Stefan
AU  - Freestone, I.C.
AU  - Živković, M.
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/381
AB  - The paper presents a set of glass fragments excavated at several different locations within and outside the late Roman fortified imperial residence Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia). This small group of eighteen fragments and mosaic glass tesserae are distinguished by their cobalt blue colour. The majority of the finds are mosaic tesserae (six pcs) and sheets of glass (five pcs), which could be related to architectural decoration (sectilia panels). Others are pieces left behind from secondary glass working (four pcs). There are also two fragments tentatively identified as window pane pieces, and only one find is a vessel sherd. The materials are dated to the 4th century. Significantly, some of the production debris and the two “window pane” fragments were found inside the destruction of a glass furnace. The analyses of the chemical glass composition of the finds confirmed that the blue colourant in all samples is cobalt, and antimony is also present at notable levels (except for one sample), likely to produce opacification of the glass. Regarding the origin of the raw glass, the data on almost all pieces suggests a Syro-Palestinian provenance, and a single sample could be related to Egyptian primary glass production. Importantly, the concentrations of the oxides added to the base glasses in order to modify the colour are positively correlated in certain samples, hinting at the makeup of the cobalt bearing ingredient and at a likely existence of particular production practices of the late Roman period.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - The blues of Romuliana
EP  - 230
IS  - 71
SP  - 207
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171207J
UR  - conv_455
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Jovanović, Sonja and Cholakova, Anastasia and Pop-Lazić, Stefan and Freestone, I.C. and Živković, M.",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The paper presents a set of glass fragments excavated at several different locations within and outside the late Roman fortified imperial residence Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia). This small group of eighteen fragments and mosaic glass tesserae are distinguished by their cobalt blue colour. The majority of the finds are mosaic tesserae (six pcs) and sheets of glass (five pcs), which could be related to architectural decoration (sectilia panels). Others are pieces left behind from secondary glass working (four pcs). There are also two fragments tentatively identified as window pane pieces, and only one find is a vessel sherd. The materials are dated to the 4th century. Significantly, some of the production debris and the two “window pane” fragments were found inside the destruction of a glass furnace. The analyses of the chemical glass composition of the finds confirmed that the blue colourant in all samples is cobalt, and antimony is also present at notable levels (except for one sample), likely to produce opacification of the glass. Regarding the origin of the raw glass, the data on almost all pieces suggests a Syro-Palestinian provenance, and a single sample could be related to Egyptian primary glass production. Importantly, the concentrations of the oxides added to the base glasses in order to modify the colour are positively correlated in certain samples, hinting at the makeup of the cobalt bearing ingredient and at a likely existence of particular production practices of the late Roman period.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "The blues of Romuliana",
pages = "230-207",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171207J",
url = "conv_455"
}
Jovanović, S., Cholakova, A., Pop-Lazić, S., Freestone, I.C.,& Živković, M.. (2021). The blues of Romuliana. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 207-230.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171207J
conv_455
Jovanović S, Cholakova A, Pop-Lazić S, Freestone I, Živković M. The blues of Romuliana. in Starinar. 2021;(71):207-230.
doi:10.2298/STA2171207J
conv_455 .
Jovanović, Sonja, Cholakova, Anastasia, Pop-Lazić, Stefan, Freestone, I.C., Živković, M., "The blues of Romuliana" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):207-230,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171207J .,
conv_455 .
1

Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae

Filzwieser, Roland; Ivanišević, Vujadin; Verhoeven, Geert J.; Gugl, Christian; Loecker, Klaus; Bugarski, Ivan; Schiel, Hannes; Wallner, Mario; Trinks, Immo; Trausmuth, Tanja; Hinterleitner, Alois; Marković, Nemanja; Docter, Roald; Daim, Falko; Neubauer, Wolfgang

(Mdpi, Basel, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Filzwieser, Roland
AU  - Ivanišević, Vujadin
AU  - Verhoeven, Geert J.
AU  - Gugl, Christian
AU  - Loecker, Klaus
AU  - Bugarski, Ivan
AU  - Schiel, Hannes
AU  - Wallner, Mario
AU  - Trinks, Immo
AU  - Trausmuth, Tanja
AU  - Hinterleitner, Alois
AU  - Marković, Nemanja
AU  - Docter, Roald
AU  - Daim, Falko
AU  - Neubauer, Wolfgang
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/380
AB  - Large parts of the urban layout of the abandoned Roman town of Bassianae (in present-day Serbia) are still discernible on the surface today due to the deliberate and targeted quarrying of the Roman foundations. In 2014, all of the town's intramural (and some extramural) areas were surveyed using aerial photography, ground-penetrating radar, and magnetometry to analyze the site's topography and to map remaining buried structures. The surveys showed a strong agreement between the digital surface model derived from the aerial photographs and the geophysical prospection data. However, many structures could only be detected by one method, underlining the benefits of a complementary archaeological prospection approach using multiple methods. This article presents the results of the extensive surveys and their comprehensive integrative interpretation, discussing Bassianae's ground plan and urban infrastructure. Starting with an overview of this Roman town's research history, we present the details of the triple prospection approach, followed by the processing, integrative analysis, and interpretation of the acquired data sets. Finally, this newly gained information is contrasted with a plan of Roman Bassianae compiled in 1935.
PB  - Mdpi, Basel
T2  - Remote Sensing
T1  - Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae
IS  - 12
VL  - 13
DO  - 10.3390/rs13122384
UR  - conv_333
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Filzwieser, Roland and Ivanišević, Vujadin and Verhoeven, Geert J. and Gugl, Christian and Loecker, Klaus and Bugarski, Ivan and Schiel, Hannes and Wallner, Mario and Trinks, Immo and Trausmuth, Tanja and Hinterleitner, Alois and Marković, Nemanja and Docter, Roald and Daim, Falko and Neubauer, Wolfgang",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Large parts of the urban layout of the abandoned Roman town of Bassianae (in present-day Serbia) are still discernible on the surface today due to the deliberate and targeted quarrying of the Roman foundations. In 2014, all of the town's intramural (and some extramural) areas were surveyed using aerial photography, ground-penetrating radar, and magnetometry to analyze the site's topography and to map remaining buried structures. The surveys showed a strong agreement between the digital surface model derived from the aerial photographs and the geophysical prospection data. However, many structures could only be detected by one method, underlining the benefits of a complementary archaeological prospection approach using multiple methods. This article presents the results of the extensive surveys and their comprehensive integrative interpretation, discussing Bassianae's ground plan and urban infrastructure. Starting with an overview of this Roman town's research history, we present the details of the triple prospection approach, followed by the processing, integrative analysis, and interpretation of the acquired data sets. Finally, this newly gained information is contrasted with a plan of Roman Bassianae compiled in 1935.",
publisher = "Mdpi, Basel",
journal = "Remote Sensing",
title = "Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae",
number = "12",
volume = "13",
doi = "10.3390/rs13122384",
url = "conv_333"
}
Filzwieser, R., Ivanišević, V., Verhoeven, G. J., Gugl, C., Loecker, K., Bugarski, I., Schiel, H., Wallner, M., Trinks, I., Trausmuth, T., Hinterleitner, A., Marković, N., Docter, R., Daim, F.,& Neubauer, W.. (2021). Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae. in Remote Sensing
Mdpi, Basel., 13(12).
https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13122384
conv_333
Filzwieser R, Ivanišević V, Verhoeven GJ, Gugl C, Loecker K, Bugarski I, Schiel H, Wallner M, Trinks I, Trausmuth T, Hinterleitner A, Marković N, Docter R, Daim F, Neubauer W. Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae. in Remote Sensing. 2021;13(12).
doi:10.3390/rs13122384
conv_333 .
Filzwieser, Roland, Ivanišević, Vujadin, Verhoeven, Geert J., Gugl, Christian, Loecker, Klaus, Bugarski, Ivan, Schiel, Hannes, Wallner, Mario, Trinks, Immo, Trausmuth, Tanja, Hinterleitner, Alois, Marković, Nemanja, Docter, Roald, Daim, Falko, Neubauer, Wolfgang, "Integrating Geophysical and Photographic Data to Visualize the Quarried Structures of the Roman Town of Bassianae" in Remote Sensing, 13, no. 12 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13122384 .,
conv_333 .
3
3
1
3

Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries

Zivkovic, Jelena; Bikić, Vesna; Georgakopoulou, Myrto; Carvajal Lopez, Jose Cristobal

(Springer Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Zivkovic, Jelena
AU  - Bikić, Vesna
AU  - Georgakopoulou, Myrto
AU  - Carvajal Lopez, Jose Cristobal
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/377
AB  - This paper discusses an archaeology of ceramic craft and artisans in the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries Belgrade and problematises its relation to historical models of urban production in the Ottoman Empire. The study focuses on five common wares, representative of the Middle Danube region, found in well-defined consumption contexts of Belgrade's intra and extra muros settlements. The production technology of these wares, including ceramic bodies, slips, and glazes, was studied with ceramic petrography and chemical analysis, and the results were interpreted using the chaine operatoire conceptual framework. The petrographic study was also used for a preliminary provenance determination of raw materials. It is proposed that Monochrome Glazed Ware, Slip-Painted Ware, and Domestic Unglazed Ware were locally made in Belgrade following the Ottoman conquest in 1521. The emergence of this production coincides with the abrupt cultural change in the Middle Danube region marked by migrations and new socio-economic conditions initiated by the Ottomans. Traits of the local production are compared to the existing corpus of knowledge on the urban craftsmanship and guilds formulated in Ottoman historiography for the purpose of developing a cross-disciplinary approach to crafts and artisans in the Ottoman Empire.
PB  - Springer Heidelberg, Heidelberg
T2  - Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences
T1  - Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
IS  - 4
VL  - 13
DO  - 10.1007/s12520-021-01306-3
UR  - conv_336
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Zivkovic, Jelena and Bikić, Vesna and Georgakopoulou, Myrto and Carvajal Lopez, Jose Cristobal",
year = "2021",
abstract = "This paper discusses an archaeology of ceramic craft and artisans in the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries Belgrade and problematises its relation to historical models of urban production in the Ottoman Empire. The study focuses on five common wares, representative of the Middle Danube region, found in well-defined consumption contexts of Belgrade's intra and extra muros settlements. The production technology of these wares, including ceramic bodies, slips, and glazes, was studied with ceramic petrography and chemical analysis, and the results were interpreted using the chaine operatoire conceptual framework. The petrographic study was also used for a preliminary provenance determination of raw materials. It is proposed that Monochrome Glazed Ware, Slip-Painted Ware, and Domestic Unglazed Ware were locally made in Belgrade following the Ottoman conquest in 1521. The emergence of this production coincides with the abrupt cultural change in the Middle Danube region marked by migrations and new socio-economic conditions initiated by the Ottomans. Traits of the local production are compared to the existing corpus of knowledge on the urban craftsmanship and guilds formulated in Ottoman historiography for the purpose of developing a cross-disciplinary approach to crafts and artisans in the Ottoman Empire.",
publisher = "Springer Heidelberg, Heidelberg",
journal = "Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences",
title = "Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries",
number = "4",
volume = "13",
doi = "10.1007/s12520-021-01306-3",
url = "conv_336"
}
Zivkovic, J., Bikić, V., Georgakopoulou, M.,& Carvajal Lopez, J. C.. (2021). Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. in Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences
Springer Heidelberg, Heidelberg., 13(4).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12520-021-01306-3
conv_336
Zivkovic J, Bikić V, Georgakopoulou M, Carvajal Lopez JC. Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. in Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences. 2021;13(4).
doi:10.1007/s12520-021-01306-3
conv_336 .
Zivkovic, Jelena, Bikić, Vesna, Georgakopoulou, Myrto, Carvajal Lopez, Jose Cristobal, "Archaeology of craft and artisans in the Ottoman Empire: a case of ceramic production in Belgrade during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries" in Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 13, no. 4 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12520-021-01306-3 .,
conv_336 .
5
3
1
3

Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma

Pilipović, Sanja

(Zavod za zaštitu spomenika kulture grada Beograda, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pilipović, Sanja
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/371
AB  - Nadgrobna stela Marka Aurelija Bita, vojnika legije IV Flavia, pronađena je u Beogradu, u Palmotićevoj ulici tokom izvođenja građevinskih radova 1989-1990. godine. Stela pripada arhitektonskom tipu, a na njenom vrhu se nalazi krunište s lavovima. Koliko je danas poznato, ona je jedinstven primer integralno sačuvane stele s kruništem ne samo u Singidunumu već i na gornjomezijskom limesu. U radu je potvrđeno da je ovaj tip stele s kruništem bio dobro poznat i u samom Singidunumu i u njegovoj široj okolini. Pored toga, sagledane su i strukturalne i ikonografske odlike stele Marka Aurelija Bita, a razmatrano je i pitanje umetničkih uticaja iz Panonije i Norika, koji su doprineli njenom nastanku u lokalnoj radionici tadašnjeg Singidunuma.
AB  - The funerary stela of Marcus Aurelius Bitus, a soldier of the Legio IV Flavia Felix, was discovered in Palmotićeva Street, Belgrade, during construction work undertaken in 1989-1990. The stela is typologically classified as being of the architectural type, and is topped by a pediment decorated with lions. To date, it remains the only known example of an intact stela with a pediment not only in Singidunum, but also along the entire Upper Moesian Limes. This paper provides evidence of the fact that this type of stelawith-pediment was not uncommon, either within Singidunum itself or throughout its wider surroundings. Additionally, the structural and iconographic features of the stela of Marcus Aurelius Bitus are studied, and the issue of artistic influences from Pannonia and Noricum, which undoubtedly influenced the stela's creation in a local workshop in what was then Singidunum, are also considered
PB  - Zavod za zaštitu spomenika kulture grada Beograda, Beograd
T2  - Nasleđe
T1  - Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma
T1  - Funerary stela with lion-decorated pediment from Singidunum
EP  - 19
IS  - 22
SP  - 9
DO  - 10.5937/nasledje2122009P
UR  - conv_287
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Pilipović, Sanja",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Nadgrobna stela Marka Aurelija Bita, vojnika legije IV Flavia, pronađena je u Beogradu, u Palmotićevoj ulici tokom izvođenja građevinskih radova 1989-1990. godine. Stela pripada arhitektonskom tipu, a na njenom vrhu se nalazi krunište s lavovima. Koliko je danas poznato, ona je jedinstven primer integralno sačuvane stele s kruništem ne samo u Singidunumu već i na gornjomezijskom limesu. U radu je potvrđeno da je ovaj tip stele s kruništem bio dobro poznat i u samom Singidunumu i u njegovoj široj okolini. Pored toga, sagledane su i strukturalne i ikonografske odlike stele Marka Aurelija Bita, a razmatrano je i pitanje umetničkih uticaja iz Panonije i Norika, koji su doprineli njenom nastanku u lokalnoj radionici tadašnjeg Singidunuma., The funerary stela of Marcus Aurelius Bitus, a soldier of the Legio IV Flavia Felix, was discovered in Palmotićeva Street, Belgrade, during construction work undertaken in 1989-1990. The stela is typologically classified as being of the architectural type, and is topped by a pediment decorated with lions. To date, it remains the only known example of an intact stela with a pediment not only in Singidunum, but also along the entire Upper Moesian Limes. This paper provides evidence of the fact that this type of stelawith-pediment was not uncommon, either within Singidunum itself or throughout its wider surroundings. Additionally, the structural and iconographic features of the stela of Marcus Aurelius Bitus are studied, and the issue of artistic influences from Pannonia and Noricum, which undoubtedly influenced the stela's creation in a local workshop in what was then Singidunum, are also considered",
publisher = "Zavod za zaštitu spomenika kulture grada Beograda, Beograd",
journal = "Nasleđe",
title = "Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma, Funerary stela with lion-decorated pediment from Singidunum",
pages = "19-9",
number = "22",
doi = "10.5937/nasledje2122009P",
url = "conv_287"
}
Pilipović, S.. (2021). Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma. in Nasleđe
Zavod za zaštitu spomenika kulture grada Beograda, Beograd.(22), 9-19.
https://doi.org/10.5937/nasledje2122009P
conv_287
Pilipović S. Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma. in Nasleđe. 2021;(22):9-19.
doi:10.5937/nasledje2122009P
conv_287 .
Pilipović, Sanja, "Nadgrobna stela s kruništem i lavovima iz Singidunuma" in Nasleđe, no. 22 (2021):9-19,
https://doi.org/10.5937/nasledje2122009P .,
conv_287 .

The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans

Gavrilović-Vitas, Nadežda

(Arheološki institut, Beograd, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Gavrilović-Vitas, Nadežda
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/370
AB  - The cult of the goddess Fortuna has been attested on the territory of Roman provinces in the Central Balkans with numerous votive monuments, sculptures, votive reliefs, statuettes and on glyptics. The goddess was particularly popular among the army, but also venerated by administrative personnel, merchants, freedmen, slaves and women. The epithets of the goddess imply that she was honoured by her devotees as in other Roman provinces – mainly as the goddess of good luck and chance, but also as the protectress of transport, business, routes and perhaps in bathing facilities. Fortuna was usually worshipped alone, but her pairing with the Egyptian goddess Isis as the syncretistic deity Isis-Fortuna and her relationship with Genii, are confirmed in different Central Balkans localities. The goddess Fortuna’s sanctuaries can be presumed in the vicinity of Ulpiana, Niš, near Kumanovo and probably in Viminacium, while her cult lasted from the 2nd to the last decades of the 3rd century.
PB  - Arheološki institut, Beograd
T2  - Starinar
T1  - The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans
EP  - 180
IS  - 71
SP  - 163
DO  - 10.2298/STA2171163G
UR  - conv_453
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Gavrilović-Vitas, Nadežda",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The cult of the goddess Fortuna has been attested on the territory of Roman provinces in the Central Balkans with numerous votive monuments, sculptures, votive reliefs, statuettes and on glyptics. The goddess was particularly popular among the army, but also venerated by administrative personnel, merchants, freedmen, slaves and women. The epithets of the goddess imply that she was honoured by her devotees as in other Roman provinces – mainly as the goddess of good luck and chance, but also as the protectress of transport, business, routes and perhaps in bathing facilities. Fortuna was usually worshipped alone, but her pairing with the Egyptian goddess Isis as the syncretistic deity Isis-Fortuna and her relationship with Genii, are confirmed in different Central Balkans localities. The goddess Fortuna’s sanctuaries can be presumed in the vicinity of Ulpiana, Niš, near Kumanovo and probably in Viminacium, while her cult lasted from the 2nd to the last decades of the 3rd century.",
publisher = "Arheološki institut, Beograd",
journal = "Starinar",
title = "The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans",
pages = "180-163",
number = "71",
doi = "10.2298/STA2171163G",
url = "conv_453"
}
Gavrilović-Vitas, N.. (2021). The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans. in Starinar
Arheološki institut, Beograd.(71), 163-180.
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171163G
conv_453
Gavrilović-Vitas N. The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans. in Starinar. 2021;(71):163-180.
doi:10.2298/STA2171163G
conv_453 .
Gavrilović-Vitas, Nadežda, "The cult of goddess fortuna in the roman central Balkans" in Starinar, no. 71 (2021):163-180,
https://doi.org/10.2298/STA2171163G .,
conv_453 .

Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC

Mehofer, Mathias; Gavranović, Mario; Kapuran, Aleksandar; Mitrović, Jovan D.; Putica, Anđelka

(Academic Press Ltd- Elsevier Science Ltd, London, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Mehofer, Mathias
AU  - Gavranović, Mario
AU  - Kapuran, Aleksandar
AU  - Mitrović, Jovan D.
AU  - Putica, Anđelka
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/378
AB  - The Balkan Peninsula played a crucial role for the introduction of metallurgy during the Copper Age and numerous archaeometallurgical examinations have delivered highly interesting insights on this topic. However, there is a lack of systematic analytical research on copper ore smelting and metal exchange for the later Bronze Age. In this paper we focus on the first archaeometallurgical results of slags from the sites Ruz?ana, Trnjane and C?oka Njica, Eastern Serbia, complimented by the discussion of XRF and lead isotope analyses carried out on 28 copper-based artefacts. Importantly, radiocarbon dating from these sites points to copper production already being undertaken at the end of the Early Bronze Age (19th?18th centuries BC), more than 500 years earlier than previously assumed. This enables us to investigate the flow of metal during the 1st half of the 2nd millennium BC. The analyses of the metallurgical slags indicate a copper matte smelting process in small open pit furnaces and the use of local sulfidic copper ore sources. The fact that these intensive smelting activities in Eastern Serbia can be paralleled with the early production hotspots in central Europe e.g. on the Hochko?nig (Mitterberg mining areas) sheds new light on the development of copper based metallurgy in Europe. At the same time, the evidence from Eastern Serbia shows that this area was a source of raw material for copper and bronze alloys providing a regional and supra-regional perspective. Furthermore, our analyses revealed the remarkable result, that by the start of the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1700 BC) copper from the Northern Italian mining areas in the Trentino region also reached the western and central Balkans.
PB  - Academic Press Ltd- Elsevier Science Ltd, London
T2  - Journal of Archaeological Science
T1  - Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC
VL  - 129
DO  - 10.1016/j.jas.2021.105378
UR  - conv_335
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Mehofer, Mathias and Gavranović, Mario and Kapuran, Aleksandar and Mitrović, Jovan D. and Putica, Anđelka",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The Balkan Peninsula played a crucial role for the introduction of metallurgy during the Copper Age and numerous archaeometallurgical examinations have delivered highly interesting insights on this topic. However, there is a lack of systematic analytical research on copper ore smelting and metal exchange for the later Bronze Age. In this paper we focus on the first archaeometallurgical results of slags from the sites Ruz?ana, Trnjane and C?oka Njica, Eastern Serbia, complimented by the discussion of XRF and lead isotope analyses carried out on 28 copper-based artefacts. Importantly, radiocarbon dating from these sites points to copper production already being undertaken at the end of the Early Bronze Age (19th?18th centuries BC), more than 500 years earlier than previously assumed. This enables us to investigate the flow of metal during the 1st half of the 2nd millennium BC. The analyses of the metallurgical slags indicate a copper matte smelting process in small open pit furnaces and the use of local sulfidic copper ore sources. The fact that these intensive smelting activities in Eastern Serbia can be paralleled with the early production hotspots in central Europe e.g. on the Hochko?nig (Mitterberg mining areas) sheds new light on the development of copper based metallurgy in Europe. At the same time, the evidence from Eastern Serbia shows that this area was a source of raw material for copper and bronze alloys providing a regional and supra-regional perspective. Furthermore, our analyses revealed the remarkable result, that by the start of the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1700 BC) copper from the Northern Italian mining areas in the Trentino region also reached the western and central Balkans.",
publisher = "Academic Press Ltd- Elsevier Science Ltd, London",
journal = "Journal of Archaeological Science",
title = "Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC",
volume = "129",
doi = "10.1016/j.jas.2021.105378",
url = "conv_335"
}
Mehofer, M., Gavranović, M., Kapuran, A., Mitrović, J. D.,& Putica, A.. (2021). Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC. in Journal of Archaeological Science
Academic Press Ltd- Elsevier Science Ltd, London., 129.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2021.105378
conv_335
Mehofer M, Gavranović M, Kapuran A, Mitrović JD, Putica A. Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC. in Journal of Archaeological Science. 2021;129.
doi:10.1016/j.jas.2021.105378
conv_335 .
Mehofer, Mathias, Gavranović, Mario, Kapuran, Aleksandar, Mitrović, Jovan D., Putica, Anđelka, "Copper production and supra-regional exchange networks ? Cu-matte smelting in the Balkans between 2000 and 1500 BC" in Journal of Archaeological Science, 129 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2021.105378 .,
conv_335 .
14
2
2

Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka

Danković, Ilija

(Univerzitet u Beogradu, Filozofski fakultet, 2021)

TY  - THES
AU  - Danković, Ilija
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://eteze.bg.ac.rs/application/showtheses?thesesId=8040
UR  - https://fedorabg.bg.ac.rs/fedora/get/o:23463/bdef:Content/download
UR  - http://vbs.rs/scripts/cobiss?command=DISPLAY&base=70036&RID=31866377
UR  - https://nardus.mpn.gov.rs/handle/123456789/18186
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/21
AB  - Predmet istraživanja doktorske disertacije su starosne grupe stanovnica antičkog Viminacijuma, definisane na osnovu materijalne kulture otkrivene u sepulkralnim celinama. Analizirano je ukupno 810 inventara grobova otkrivenih tokom višedecenijskih iskopavanja viminacijumskih nekropola. Osnovni cilj istraživanja bilo je utvrđivanje pravilnosti u izboru grobnog inventara za određene starosne kategorije i njihovo upoređivanje sa podacima dobijenim analizama fizičkih antropologa. Na ovaj način izvršen je pokušaj dobijanja obrasca za prepoznavanje starosnih grupa, čak i u situaciji kada usled loše očuvanosti kostiju nije moguće utvrditi biološki pol i starost. U širem smislu, cilj disertacije podrazumevao je stavljanje akcenta na proučavanje ženskog življa Viminacijuma i provincije Gornje Mezije koji je uglavnom zapostavljeni i „nevidljivi” deo populacije. Preokupacija istraživača temama vezanim za muški domen često dovodi i do previda u smislu interpretacije određenih artefakata koji se mogu vezati za žensko stanovništvo, čije sagledavanje u smislu čisto estetske ili kozmetičke funkcije dovodi do produbljivanja i istrajavanja rodnih stereotipa. Analizom grobnih inventara poteklih iz sahrana ženskog dela populacije antičkog Viminacijuma sagledane su pravilnosti u izboru materijalne kulture polagane uz pokojnice u zavisnosti od njihove pripadnosti određenoj starosnoj kategoriji stanovništva. Uočena su četiri osnovna doba koja korespondiraju sa šturim podacima o stadijumima životnog toka dostupnim u delima antičkih pisaca. Najraniji period života (infantia) karakteriše prisustvo tzv. crepundia, predmeta apotropejskog karaktera, čija je uloga bila zaštita dece tokom života, ali i u smrti. Među zapažanjima vezanim za ovu starosnu kohortu ističe se ono o nepostojanju razlika u inventaru u odnosu na biološki pol deteta, što upućuje na zaključak da su svi pripadnici najmlađe kategorije stanovništva tretirani kao jedinstveni rod. Individue svrstane u drugo životno razdoblje (pueritia) najteže su uočljive u funerarnom kontekstu, i moguće ih je u izuzetno retkim slučajevima konstatovati na osnovu prvih kovčežića sa delovima polomljenog nakita. Treću starosnu grupu čine devojke, zakonski starije od 12 godina, s tim što je ta starosna granica mogla da varira u zavisnosti od pojave simptoma puberteta1, pre svega menarhe. Za ovu kategoriju stanovništva vezan je posebni fenomen sahrana sa neuobičajeno raskošnim repertoarom grobnih inventara. Nakon udaje, centralnog momenta u životima žena u antici, konstrukcija identiteta kroz materijalnu kulturu zasnivala se na opštim mestima brige o domaćinstvu, porodici i sopstvenom telu, kroz model diskretne elegancije i ulepšavanja, koje je trebalo da naglasi razliku pripadnice rimskog društva od „necivilizovanog“ ostatka sveta. Materijalna kultura koja je mogla sa sigurnošću biti vezana za pobrojane starosne kategorije reflektuje simboličke koncepte i načine konstruisanja identiteta tipične za grčko-rimske tradicije mediteranskog kulturnog kruga, sa brojnim analogijama na teritoriji rano romanizovanih provincija, ali i samog Apeninskog poluostrva.
AB  - The research subject of this thesis are age groups of female inhabitants of ancient Viminacium, defined according to material culture discovered in sepulchral context. Inventories of 810 graves, discovered during several decades of excavations, have been analysed. The main goal of the research was the determination of patterns in the choice of grave furnishings and their cross-referencing with data provided by physical anthropologists. In such a manner, an attempt was made to develop a system for determination of the age of the deceased, even in cases where skeletal remains are poorly preserved and unavailable for examining. In a broader sense, the goal of the thesis was emphasizing the need for studying the female population of Viminacium and the province of Upper Moesia which is usually neglected and „invisible“ part of the society. Scholars’ preoccupation with themes related to the male domain often leads to oversights in the interpretation of certain artefacts which are related to females. Attributing purely aesthetic or cosmetic functions to these objects results in strengthening and perpetuation of gender stereotypes. Analysis of grave furnishings originating from burials of the female population of ancient Viminacium led to recognizing of the consistencies in choice of the material culture deposited with the deceased depending on their age cohort. Four main age groups have been observed, which is in accordance with modest evidence about the Roman life course that can be found in ancient literary works. The earliest period of life (infantia) is characterized by the presence of the so-called crepundia, objects of apotropaic character, which main purpose was the protection of children during life, but in death as well. Observations regarding this age cohort that stands out, is the one about the non-existence of differences in grave furnishings between two biological sexes. It further implies that all members of this particular cohort were treated as a separate gender. Individuals classified into second life stage (pueritia) are hardest to observe in a funerary context and can be recognized in extremely rare cases based on the presence of girl's first caskets guarding pieces of broken jewellery and other trinkets. The third age group consists of maidens, legally above the f 12 years of age, having in mind that this threshold could vary depending on the occurrence of the symptoms of puberty, above all the menarche. This social category is connected with the distinct phenomenon of burials with unusually lavish repertoires of grave furnishings. After the wedding, focal point in the lives of women in the Roman world, construction of identity through material culture was based on the care for the household, the family and the body, through model of discreet elegance and beautification, which was intended to highlight the disparity between the Roman woman and the „uncivilized“ rest of the world. The material culture that could be brought in connection with the aforementioned age categories with certainty, reflects symbolical concepts and ways of identity construction typical of Graeco-Roman traditions of the Mediterranean cultural circle, with numerous analogies from the territories of early Romanized provinces, as well as Apennine peninsula itself.
PB  - Univerzitet u Beogradu, Filozofski fakultet
T1  - Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka
T1  - Grave goods in female burials as indicators of age : a case study of Viminaciums cemeteries from the 1st to the 4th century
UR  - https://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_nardus_18186
UR  - t-11309
ER  - 
@phdthesis{
author = "Danković, Ilija",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Predmet istraživanja doktorske disertacije su starosne grupe stanovnica antičkog Viminacijuma, definisane na osnovu materijalne kulture otkrivene u sepulkralnim celinama. Analizirano je ukupno 810 inventara grobova otkrivenih tokom višedecenijskih iskopavanja viminacijumskih nekropola. Osnovni cilj istraživanja bilo je utvrđivanje pravilnosti u izboru grobnog inventara za određene starosne kategorije i njihovo upoređivanje sa podacima dobijenim analizama fizičkih antropologa. Na ovaj način izvršen je pokušaj dobijanja obrasca za prepoznavanje starosnih grupa, čak i u situaciji kada usled loše očuvanosti kostiju nije moguće utvrditi biološki pol i starost. U širem smislu, cilj disertacije podrazumevao je stavljanje akcenta na proučavanje ženskog življa Viminacijuma i provincije Gornje Mezije koji je uglavnom zapostavljeni i „nevidljivi” deo populacije. Preokupacija istraživača temama vezanim za muški domen često dovodi i do previda u smislu interpretacije određenih artefakata koji se mogu vezati za žensko stanovništvo, čije sagledavanje u smislu čisto estetske ili kozmetičke funkcije dovodi do produbljivanja i istrajavanja rodnih stereotipa. Analizom grobnih inventara poteklih iz sahrana ženskog dela populacije antičkog Viminacijuma sagledane su pravilnosti u izboru materijalne kulture polagane uz pokojnice u zavisnosti od njihove pripadnosti određenoj starosnoj kategoriji stanovništva. Uočena su četiri osnovna doba koja korespondiraju sa šturim podacima o stadijumima životnog toka dostupnim u delima antičkih pisaca. Najraniji period života (infantia) karakteriše prisustvo tzv. crepundia, predmeta apotropejskog karaktera, čija je uloga bila zaštita dece tokom života, ali i u smrti. Među zapažanjima vezanim za ovu starosnu kohortu ističe se ono o nepostojanju razlika u inventaru u odnosu na biološki pol deteta, što upućuje na zaključak da su svi pripadnici najmlađe kategorije stanovništva tretirani kao jedinstveni rod. Individue svrstane u drugo životno razdoblje (pueritia) najteže su uočljive u funerarnom kontekstu, i moguće ih je u izuzetno retkim slučajevima konstatovati na osnovu prvih kovčežića sa delovima polomljenog nakita. Treću starosnu grupu čine devojke, zakonski starije od 12 godina, s tim što je ta starosna granica mogla da varira u zavisnosti od pojave simptoma puberteta1, pre svega menarhe. Za ovu kategoriju stanovništva vezan je posebni fenomen sahrana sa neuobičajeno raskošnim repertoarom grobnih inventara. Nakon udaje, centralnog momenta u životima žena u antici, konstrukcija identiteta kroz materijalnu kulturu zasnivala se na opštim mestima brige o domaćinstvu, porodici i sopstvenom telu, kroz model diskretne elegancije i ulepšavanja, koje je trebalo da naglasi razliku pripadnice rimskog društva od „necivilizovanog“ ostatka sveta. Materijalna kultura koja je mogla sa sigurnošću biti vezana za pobrojane starosne kategorije reflektuje simboličke koncepte i načine konstruisanja identiteta tipične za grčko-rimske tradicije mediteranskog kulturnog kruga, sa brojnim analogijama na teritoriji rano romanizovanih provincija, ali i samog Apeninskog poluostrva., The research subject of this thesis are age groups of female inhabitants of ancient Viminacium, defined according to material culture discovered in sepulchral context. Inventories of 810 graves, discovered during several decades of excavations, have been analysed. The main goal of the research was the determination of patterns in the choice of grave furnishings and their cross-referencing with data provided by physical anthropologists. In such a manner, an attempt was made to develop a system for determination of the age of the deceased, even in cases where skeletal remains are poorly preserved and unavailable for examining. In a broader sense, the goal of the thesis was emphasizing the need for studying the female population of Viminacium and the province of Upper Moesia which is usually neglected and „invisible“ part of the society. Scholars’ preoccupation with themes related to the male domain often leads to oversights in the interpretation of certain artefacts which are related to females. Attributing purely aesthetic or cosmetic functions to these objects results in strengthening and perpetuation of gender stereotypes. Analysis of grave furnishings originating from burials of the female population of ancient Viminacium led to recognizing of the consistencies in choice of the material culture deposited with the deceased depending on their age cohort. Four main age groups have been observed, which is in accordance with modest evidence about the Roman life course that can be found in ancient literary works. The earliest period of life (infantia) is characterized by the presence of the so-called crepundia, objects of apotropaic character, which main purpose was the protection of children during life, but in death as well. Observations regarding this age cohort that stands out, is the one about the non-existence of differences in grave furnishings between two biological sexes. It further implies that all members of this particular cohort were treated as a separate gender. Individuals classified into second life stage (pueritia) are hardest to observe in a funerary context and can be recognized in extremely rare cases based on the presence of girl's first caskets guarding pieces of broken jewellery and other trinkets. The third age group consists of maidens, legally above the f 12 years of age, having in mind that this threshold could vary depending on the occurrence of the symptoms of puberty, above all the menarche. This social category is connected with the distinct phenomenon of burials with unusually lavish repertoires of grave furnishings. After the wedding, focal point in the lives of women in the Roman world, construction of identity through material culture was based on the care for the household, the family and the body, through model of discreet elegance and beautification, which was intended to highlight the disparity between the Roman woman and the „uncivilized“ rest of the world. The material culture that could be brought in connection with the aforementioned age categories with certainty, reflects symbolical concepts and ways of identity construction typical of Graeco-Roman traditions of the Mediterranean cultural circle, with numerous analogies from the territories of early Romanized provinces, as well as Apennine peninsula itself.",
publisher = "Univerzitet u Beogradu, Filozofski fakultet",
title = "Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka, Grave goods in female burials as indicators of age : a case study of Viminaciums cemeteries from the 1st to the 4th century",
url = "https://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_nardus_18186, t-11309"
}
Danković, I.. (2021). Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka. 
Univerzitet u Beogradu, Filozofski fakultet..
https://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_nardus_18186
Danković I. Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka. 2021;.
https://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_nardus_18186 .
Danković, Ilija, "Inventar grobova ženske populacije kao odraz životnog doba: studija slučaja viminacijumskih nekropola od I do IV veka" (2021),
https://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_nardus_18186 .

Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus

Ottoni, Claudio; Borić, Dušan; Cheronet, Olivia; Sparacello, Vitale; Dori, Irene; Coppa, Alfredo; Antonović, Dragana; Vujević, Dario; Price, Douglas T.; Pinhasi, Ron; Cristiani, Emanuela

(Natl Acad Sciences, Washington, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ottoni, Claudio
AU  - Borić, Dušan
AU  - Cheronet, Olivia
AU  - Sparacello, Vitale
AU  - Dori, Irene
AU  - Coppa, Alfredo
AU  - Antonović, Dragana
AU  - Vujević, Dario
AU  - Price, Douglas T.
AU  - Pinhasi, Ron
AU  - Cristiani, Emanuela
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/372
AB  - Archaeological dental calculus, or mineralized plaque, is a key tool to track the evolution of oral microbiota across time in response to processes that impacted our culture and biology, such as the rise of farming during the Neolithic. However, the extent to which the human oral flora changed from prehistory until present has remained elusive due to the scarcity of data on the microbiomes of prehistoric humans. Here, we present our reconstruction of oral microbiomes via shotgun metagenomics of dental calculus in 44 ancient foragers and farmers from two regions playing a pivotal role in the spread of farming across Europe-the Balkans and the Italian Peninsula. We show that the introduction of farming in Southern Europe did not alter significantly the oral microbiomes of local forager groups, and it was in particular associated with a higher abundance of the species Olsenella sp. oral taxon 807. The human oral environment in prehistory was dominated by a microbial species, Anaerolineaceae bacterium oral taxon 439, that diversified geographically. A Near Eastern lineage of this bacterial commensal dispersed with Neolithic farmers and replaced the variant present in the local foragers. Our findings also illustrate that major taxonomic shifts in human oral microbiome composition occurred after the Neolithic and that the functional profile of modern humans evolved in recent times to develop peculiar mechanisms of antibiotic resistance that were previously absent.
PB  - Natl Acad Sciences, Washington
T2  - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
T1  - Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus
IS  - 32
VL  - 118
DO  - 10.1073/pnas.2102116118
UR  - conv_316
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ottoni, Claudio and Borić, Dušan and Cheronet, Olivia and Sparacello, Vitale and Dori, Irene and Coppa, Alfredo and Antonović, Dragana and Vujević, Dario and Price, Douglas T. and Pinhasi, Ron and Cristiani, Emanuela",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Archaeological dental calculus, or mineralized plaque, is a key tool to track the evolution of oral microbiota across time in response to processes that impacted our culture and biology, such as the rise of farming during the Neolithic. However, the extent to which the human oral flora changed from prehistory until present has remained elusive due to the scarcity of data on the microbiomes of prehistoric humans. Here, we present our reconstruction of oral microbiomes via shotgun metagenomics of dental calculus in 44 ancient foragers and farmers from two regions playing a pivotal role in the spread of farming across Europe-the Balkans and the Italian Peninsula. We show that the introduction of farming in Southern Europe did not alter significantly the oral microbiomes of local forager groups, and it was in particular associated with a higher abundance of the species Olsenella sp. oral taxon 807. The human oral environment in prehistory was dominated by a microbial species, Anaerolineaceae bacterium oral taxon 439, that diversified geographically. A Near Eastern lineage of this bacterial commensal dispersed with Neolithic farmers and replaced the variant present in the local foragers. Our findings also illustrate that major taxonomic shifts in human oral microbiome composition occurred after the Neolithic and that the functional profile of modern humans evolved in recent times to develop peculiar mechanisms of antibiotic resistance that were previously absent.",
publisher = "Natl Acad Sciences, Washington",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
title = "Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus",
number = "32",
volume = "118",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.2102116118",
url = "conv_316"
}
Ottoni, C., Borić, D., Cheronet, O., Sparacello, V., Dori, I., Coppa, A., Antonović, D., Vujević, D., Price, D. T., Pinhasi, R.,& Cristiani, E.. (2021). Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Natl Acad Sciences, Washington., 118(32).
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2102116118
conv_316
Ottoni C, Borić D, Cheronet O, Sparacello V, Dori I, Coppa A, Antonović D, Vujević D, Price DT, Pinhasi R, Cristiani E. Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2021;118(32).
doi:10.1073/pnas.2102116118
conv_316 .
Ottoni, Claudio, Borić, Dušan, Cheronet, Olivia, Sparacello, Vitale, Dori, Irene, Coppa, Alfredo, Antonović, Dragana, Vujević, Dario, Price, Douglas T., Pinhasi, Ron, Cristiani, Emanuela, "Tracking the transition to agriculture in Southern Europe through ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus" in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118, no. 32 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2102116118 .,
conv_316 .
150
7
4

Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries

Zivkovic, Jelena; Bikić, Vesna; Lopez, Jose Cristobal Carvajal; Georgakopoulou, Myrto

(Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Zivkovic, Jelena
AU  - Bikić, Vesna
AU  - Lopez, Jose Cristobal Carvajal
AU  - Georgakopoulou, Myrto
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/376
AB  - This paper discusses a micro-scale study of the technology, provenance and organisation of ceramic production in Belgrade during the 14th-15th centuries (the Late Medieval period). The study is situated in the context of the Middle Danube frontier and examines the impact of long-term military pressure on local craftsmanship in Belgrade. The production is reconstructed by methods of petrographic and chemical analyses of ceramics consumed in two households of Belgrade?s intra and extra muros settlements. The results indicate that two distinct technological traditions flourished in Belgrade during the 14th and 15th century respectively, each attached to a different community of practice. The production was diversified in the 15th century in a way that suggests that the distribution networks of local workshops were aimed at different social groups. It is suggested that this mode of craft organisation developed as a consequence of social divisions and military events on the frontier.
PB  - Elsevier, Amsterdam
T2  - Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
T1  - Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries
VL  - 36
DO  - 10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102809
UR  - conv_337
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Zivkovic, Jelena and Bikić, Vesna and Lopez, Jose Cristobal Carvajal and Georgakopoulou, Myrto",
year = "2021",
abstract = "This paper discusses a micro-scale study of the technology, provenance and organisation of ceramic production in Belgrade during the 14th-15th centuries (the Late Medieval period). The study is situated in the context of the Middle Danube frontier and examines the impact of long-term military pressure on local craftsmanship in Belgrade. The production is reconstructed by methods of petrographic and chemical analyses of ceramics consumed in two households of Belgrade?s intra and extra muros settlements. The results indicate that two distinct technological traditions flourished in Belgrade during the 14th and 15th century respectively, each attached to a different community of practice. The production was diversified in the 15th century in a way that suggests that the distribution networks of local workshops were aimed at different social groups. It is suggested that this mode of craft organisation developed as a consequence of social divisions and military events on the frontier.",
publisher = "Elsevier, Amsterdam",
journal = "Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports",
title = "Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries",
volume = "36",
doi = "10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102809",
url = "conv_337"
}
Zivkovic, J., Bikić, V., Lopez, J. C. C.,& Georgakopoulou, M.. (2021). Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries. in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Elsevier, Amsterdam., 36.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102809
conv_337
Zivkovic J, Bikić V, Lopez JCC, Georgakopoulou M. Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries. in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 2021;36.
doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102809
conv_337 .
Zivkovic, Jelena, Bikić, Vesna, Lopez, Jose Cristobal Carvajal, Georgakopoulou, Myrto, "Ceramic production on the Middle Danube frontier: Belgrade in the 14th and 15th centuries" in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 36 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102809 .,
conv_337 .
4
2
2
2

Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture

Cristiani, Emanuela; Radini, Anita; Zupancich, Andrea; Gismondi, Angelo; D'Agostino, Alessia; Ottoni, Claudio; Carra, Marialetizia; Vukojičić, Snežana; Constantinescu, Mihai; Antonović, Dragana; Price, Douglas T.; Borić, Dušan

(Elife Sciences Publ Ltd, Cambridge, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Cristiani, Emanuela
AU  - Radini, Anita
AU  - Zupancich, Andrea
AU  - Gismondi, Angelo
AU  - D'Agostino, Alessia
AU  - Ottoni, Claudio
AU  - Carra, Marialetizia
AU  - Vukojičić, Snežana
AU  - Constantinescu, Mihai
AU  - Antonović, Dragana
AU  - Price, Douglas T.
AU  - Borić, Dušan
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/374
AB  - Forager focus on wild cereal plants has been documented in the core zone of domestication in southwestern Asia, while evidence for forager use of wild grass grains remains sporadic elsewhere. In this paper, we present starch grain and phytolith analyses of dental calculus from 60 Mesolithic and Early Neolithic individuals from five sites in the Danube Gorges of the central Balkans. This zone was inhabited by likely complex Holocene foragers for several millennia before the appearance of the first farmers similar to 6200 cal BC. We also analyzed forager ground stone tools (GSTs) for evidence of plant processing. Our results based on the study of dental calculus show that certain species of Poaceae (species of the genus Aegi(ops) were used since the Early Mesolithic, while GSTs exhibit traces of a developed grass grain processing technology. The adoption of domesticated plants in this region after similar to 6500 cal BC might have been eased by the existing familiarity with wild cereals.
PB  - Elife Sciences Publ Ltd, Cambridge
T2  - ELIFE
T1  - Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture
VL  - 10
DO  - 10.7554/eLife.72976
UR  - conv_330
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Cristiani, Emanuela and Radini, Anita and Zupancich, Andrea and Gismondi, Angelo and D'Agostino, Alessia and Ottoni, Claudio and Carra, Marialetizia and Vukojičić, Snežana and Constantinescu, Mihai and Antonović, Dragana and Price, Douglas T. and Borić, Dušan",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Forager focus on wild cereal plants has been documented in the core zone of domestication in southwestern Asia, while evidence for forager use of wild grass grains remains sporadic elsewhere. In this paper, we present starch grain and phytolith analyses of dental calculus from 60 Mesolithic and Early Neolithic individuals from five sites in the Danube Gorges of the central Balkans. This zone was inhabited by likely complex Holocene foragers for several millennia before the appearance of the first farmers similar to 6200 cal BC. We also analyzed forager ground stone tools (GSTs) for evidence of plant processing. Our results based on the study of dental calculus show that certain species of Poaceae (species of the genus Aegi(ops) were used since the Early Mesolithic, while GSTs exhibit traces of a developed grass grain processing technology. The adoption of domesticated plants in this region after similar to 6500 cal BC might have been eased by the existing familiarity with wild cereals.",
publisher = "Elife Sciences Publ Ltd, Cambridge",
journal = "ELIFE",
title = "Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture",
volume = "10",
doi = "10.7554/eLife.72976",
url = "conv_330"
}
Cristiani, E., Radini, A., Zupancich, A., Gismondi, A., D'Agostino, A., Ottoni, C., Carra, M., Vukojičić, S., Constantinescu, M., Antonović, D., Price, D. T.,& Borić, D.. (2021). Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture. in ELIFE
Elife Sciences Publ Ltd, Cambridge., 10.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.72976
conv_330
Cristiani E, Radini A, Zupancich A, Gismondi A, D'Agostino A, Ottoni C, Carra M, Vukojičić S, Constantinescu M, Antonović D, Price DT, Borić D. Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture. in ELIFE. 2021;10.
doi:10.7554/eLife.72976
conv_330 .
Cristiani, Emanuela, Radini, Anita, Zupancich, Andrea, Gismondi, Angelo, D'Agostino, Alessia, Ottoni, Claudio, Carra, Marialetizia, Vukojičić, Snežana, Constantinescu, Mihai, Antonović, Dragana, Price, Douglas T., Borić, Dušan, "Wild cereal grain consumption among Early Holocene foragers of the Balkans predates the arrival of agriculture" in ELIFE, 10 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.72976 .,
conv_330 .
60

Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans)

Marković, Nemanja; Bikić, Vesna; Temerinski, Zeljka; Vučetić, Snežana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua

(Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Marković, Nemanja
AU  - Bikić, Vesna
AU  - Temerinski, Zeljka
AU  - Vučetić, Snežana
AU  - Ranogajec, Jonjaua
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/382
AB  - Organic materials are rare in the archaeological settlement context of the central Balkan area. A unique assemblage consisting of mummified animal skin with preserved hair, filled with resinous material, and four smaller pieces of animal skin with preserved hair was discovered during archaeological excavations of the Novo Brdo castle in 2015. The late medieval town of Novo Brdo was an important mining centre of the Balkans (and the entire Europe) for the production and distribution of silver ore. The archaeological context for the mummified animal skin was the workshop for the production of lead projectiles, situated in the northeast corner of the castle's Great Hall, and it can be reliably dated to the first half of 1455. The finds were first subjected to macroscopic analysis, which included observations on the skinning method and the details of use. Applying light and SEM microscopy, a comparative set of hair surface structure images from seven mammal species was created, and a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis of resinous material was performed. By comparing it with the reference images of hair microstructure, the animal skin was identified as goat, while the FTIR of the resinous material identified pine tar. The four smaller pieces of skin probably originated from one individual sheep. The tar stored in the goat skin was most likely used in the impregnation of wooden structures or even to illuminate buildings and ramparts of the Novo Brdo castle, although other purposes, such as being used as a lubricant for weapons, cannot be completely ruled out.
PB  - Elsevier, Amsterdam
T2  - Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
T1  - Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans)
VL  - 40
DO  - 10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103227
UR  - conv_331
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Marković, Nemanja and Bikić, Vesna and Temerinski, Zeljka and Vučetić, Snežana and Ranogajec, Jonjaua",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Organic materials are rare in the archaeological settlement context of the central Balkan area. A unique assemblage consisting of mummified animal skin with preserved hair, filled with resinous material, and four smaller pieces of animal skin with preserved hair was discovered during archaeological excavations of the Novo Brdo castle in 2015. The late medieval town of Novo Brdo was an important mining centre of the Balkans (and the entire Europe) for the production and distribution of silver ore. The archaeological context for the mummified animal skin was the workshop for the production of lead projectiles, situated in the northeast corner of the castle's Great Hall, and it can be reliably dated to the first half of 1455. The finds were first subjected to macroscopic analysis, which included observations on the skinning method and the details of use. Applying light and SEM microscopy, a comparative set of hair surface structure images from seven mammal species was created, and a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis of resinous material was performed. By comparing it with the reference images of hair microstructure, the animal skin was identified as goat, while the FTIR of the resinous material identified pine tar. The four smaller pieces of skin probably originated from one individual sheep. The tar stored in the goat skin was most likely used in the impregnation of wooden structures or even to illuminate buildings and ramparts of the Novo Brdo castle, although other purposes, such as being used as a lubricant for weapons, cannot be completely ruled out.",
publisher = "Elsevier, Amsterdam",
journal = "Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports",
title = "Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans)",
volume = "40",
doi = "10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103227",
url = "conv_331"
}
Marković, N., Bikić, V., Temerinski, Z., Vučetić, S.,& Ranogajec, J.. (2021). Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans). in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Elsevier, Amsterdam., 40.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103227
conv_331
Marković N, Bikić V, Temerinski Z, Vučetić S, Ranogajec J. Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans). in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 2021;40.
doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103227
conv_331 .
Marković, Nemanja, Bikić, Vesna, Temerinski, Zeljka, Vučetić, Snežana, Ranogajec, Jonjaua, "Mummified animal skin with tar content from the castle of the late medieval town of Novo Brdo (Central Balkans)" in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 40 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103227 .,
conv_331 .

Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types

Dizdar, M.; Kapuran, Aleksandar

(Verlag der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Dizdar, M.
AU  - Kapuran, Aleksandar
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/383
AB  - The Late Hallstatt period in the southern Carpathian Basin is marked by complex cultural relations for which the current knowledge is mostly based on the analyses of cemeteries. One of the most prolific forms of female jewellery in graves is bronze and silver temple rings that were used to decorate the head or hair. This is testified to by finds from the inhumation graves in Donja Dolina, where several pairs of temple rings, often of different forms, were located on both sides of the women's heads. Four basic types have been distinguished according to differences in the design of the terminals, and there are different variants according to the method of shaping the body. The oldest burial phases in Donja Dolina are characterized by smooth temple rings with a conical thickening at the terminals (Ciumbrud type), which have been found in the highest numbers in the inhumation graves in Transylvania. Temple rings of the Ciumbrud type from Donja Dolina should probably be seen as a reflection of established contacts and cultural transfer, but we should not completely rule out the possibility of the individual mobility of women. The reconstruction of how they were worn makes it possible to analyse the female bodily ornamentation, indicating that these are gender-specific items, which became an important part of the visual identity of women.
PB  - Verlag der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
T2  - Archaeologia Austriaca
T1  - Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types
EP  - 204
SP  - 149
VL  - Band 105/2021
DO  - 10.1553/archaeologia105s149
UR  - conv_456
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Dizdar, M. and Kapuran, Aleksandar",
year = "2021",
abstract = "The Late Hallstatt period in the southern Carpathian Basin is marked by complex cultural relations for which the current knowledge is mostly based on the analyses of cemeteries. One of the most prolific forms of female jewellery in graves is bronze and silver temple rings that were used to decorate the head or hair. This is testified to by finds from the inhumation graves in Donja Dolina, where several pairs of temple rings, often of different forms, were located on both sides of the women's heads. Four basic types have been distinguished according to differences in the design of the terminals, and there are different variants according to the method of shaping the body. The oldest burial phases in Donja Dolina are characterized by smooth temple rings with a conical thickening at the terminals (Ciumbrud type), which have been found in the highest numbers in the inhumation graves in Transylvania. Temple rings of the Ciumbrud type from Donja Dolina should probably be seen as a reflection of established contacts and cultural transfer, but we should not completely rule out the possibility of the individual mobility of women. The reconstruction of how they were worn makes it possible to analyse the female bodily ornamentation, indicating that these are gender-specific items, which became an important part of the visual identity of women.",
publisher = "Verlag der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften",
journal = "Archaeologia Austriaca",
title = "Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types",
pages = "204-149",
volume = "Band 105/2021",
doi = "10.1553/archaeologia105s149",
url = "conv_456"
}
Dizdar, M.,& Kapuran, A.. (2021). Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types. in Archaeologia Austriaca
Verlag der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften., Band 105/2021, 149-204.
https://doi.org/10.1553/archaeologia105s149
conv_456
Dizdar M, Kapuran A. Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types. in Archaeologia Austriaca. 2021;Band 105/2021:149-204.
doi:10.1553/archaeologia105s149
conv_456 .
Dizdar, M., Kapuran, Aleksandar, "Late Hallstatt Female Head/Hair Decoration in the Southern Carpathian Basin. Temple Rings of the Ciumbrud and Donja Dolina Types" in Archaeologia Austriaca, Band 105/2021 (2021):149-204,
https://doi.org/10.1553/archaeologia105s149 .,
conv_456 .

The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima)

Marković, Nemanja; Ivanišević, Vujadin; Baron, Henriette; Lawless, Craig; Buckley, Michael

(Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2021)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Marković, Nemanja
AU  - Ivanišević, Vujadin
AU  - Baron, Henriette
AU  - Lawless, Craig
AU  - Buckley, Michael
PY  - 2021
UR  - http://rai.ai.ac.rs/handle/123456789/379
AB  - Camels played an important role in caravan traffic and long-distance communication during the early Byzantine period as indicated by new findings from Caricin Grad. Excavations at the site revealed the remains of an important early Byzantine city, which has been identified with Justiniana Prima founded in the 530 s by Justinian I (527-565). The city, created ex nihilo, in a rural area in the north-west of the province of Dacia Mediterranea, represents a distinctive example of late urbanisation. Given the existence of the city for only 80 years and the fact that the nearby locality remained uninhabited until modern times, the site has yielded well-preserved monuments and remains of material culture. They allow for a detailed study of the urbanism, architecture, material culture and other aspects of daily life from the second quarter of the 6th century to the beginning of the 7th century. Here we investigate the camel remains discovered in five locations in Caricin Grad. Morphometric and proteomic analyses, including both collagen peptide mass fingerprint analysis (ZooMS) as well as in-depth sequencing, revealed that the majority originate from hybrids of the dromedary and Bactrian camels. Supported by written sources from the Early Byzantine period, it appears as though the use of the Caricin Grad camels was primarily for civilian purposes. These results highlight the complementarity of morphometric and proteomic approaches and their value in better understanding the impact of the early Byzantine economy.
PB  - Elsevier, Amsterdam
T2  - Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
T1  - The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima)
VL  - 38
DO  - 10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103038
UR  - conv_334
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Marković, Nemanja and Ivanišević, Vujadin and Baron, Henriette and Lawless, Craig and Buckley, Michael",
year = "2021",
abstract = "Camels played an important role in caravan traffic and long-distance communication during the early Byzantine period as indicated by new findings from Caricin Grad. Excavations at the site revealed the remains of an important early Byzantine city, which has been identified with Justiniana Prima founded in the 530 s by Justinian I (527-565). The city, created ex nihilo, in a rural area in the north-west of the province of Dacia Mediterranea, represents a distinctive example of late urbanisation. Given the existence of the city for only 80 years and the fact that the nearby locality remained uninhabited until modern times, the site has yielded well-preserved monuments and remains of material culture. They allow for a detailed study of the urbanism, architecture, material culture and other aspects of daily life from the second quarter of the 6th century to the beginning of the 7th century. Here we investigate the camel remains discovered in five locations in Caricin Grad. Morphometric and proteomic analyses, including both collagen peptide mass fingerprint analysis (ZooMS) as well as in-depth sequencing, revealed that the majority originate from hybrids of the dromedary and Bactrian camels. Supported by written sources from the Early Byzantine period, it appears as though the use of the Caricin Grad camels was primarily for civilian purposes. These results highlight the complementarity of morphometric and proteomic approaches and their value in better understanding the impact of the early Byzantine economy.",
publisher = "Elsevier, Amsterdam",
journal = "Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports",
title = "The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima)",
volume = "38",
doi = "10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103038",
url = "conv_334"
}
Marković, N., Ivanišević, V., Baron, H., Lawless, C.,& Buckley, M.. (2021). The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima). in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Elsevier, Amsterdam., 38.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103038
conv_334
Marković N, Ivanišević V, Baron H, Lawless C, Buckley M. The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima). in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 2021;38.
doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103038
conv_334 .
Marković, Nemanja, Ivanišević, Vujadin, Baron, Henriette, Lawless, Craig, Buckley, Michael, "The last caravans in antiquity: Camel remains from Caricin Grad (Justiniana Prima)" in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 38 (2021),
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.103038 .,
conv_334 .
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